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Professor Peter Congdon

Research Professor in Quantitative Geography and Health Statistics

email: p.congdon@qmul.ac.uk
Tel: 020 7882 2778
Location: Geography building, Room 204

Profile

Peter Congdon

I am a quantitative geographer with particular interests in geographic epidemiology, application of spatial statistical methods to area health and health survey data, and spatial demography. Since 2001 I have been a Research Professor in the School of Geography, and am also affiliated to the QMUL Centre for Statistics. I have authored a range of articles and books, including ‘Applied Bayesian Hierarchical Methods’ (CRC, 2010) and ‘Bayesian Statistical Modelling’ (Wiley, 2006). My major projects recently have been development of health indicators (e.g. diabetes, obesity) for US micro areas (Zip Code Tracts), developing Scotland datazone population estimates using administrative datasets, and geographic interpolation to estimate area disease prevalence in North East London.

Personal web page

Key Publications

Professional Activities and Outreach

  • Elected Member, International Statistical Institute
  • Editorial Board (Spatial Statistics), Springer Handbook of Regional Science, 2013
  • Editorial Board Member, Journal of Biometrics & Biostatistics
  • Editorial Board of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
  • Refereeing grant applications/project reviewing on behalf of ESRC, NHS Service Delivery and Organisation R&D Programme, Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Arts and Humanities Research Board; Research Grants Council (Hong Kong); Health Research Council of New Zealand; ESRC-NWO Bilateral Research Scheme, Chief Scientist Office (Edinburgh) HSR Training Scheme.
  • Referee Panel ESRC/MRC Joint Studentship and Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme
  • Chartered Statistician (Royal Statistical Society)

Downloads:

Bayesian Categorical Data [.zip 510 KB]
 

Teaching

Teaching: MSc International Health (Social Determinants of Health: Ecological Approaches)

Research

Research interests:


I US Micro-Area Health
Health care profiles for US micro areas (Census 2000 and 2010 Zip Code Tracts) have been developed in collaboration with the National Minority Quality Forum (http://www.nmqf.org/). This has involved a variety of modelling techniques (multilevel, spatial) in the development of chronic health indicators, especially indicators of population prevalence (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer prevalence) or risk exposure (lead risk). The estimates are disaggregated by age group and ethnicity.

Illustrative Outputs:

 


II Small Area Demography

This group of projects includes development of small area life table methods (in collaboration with Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC) and investigating Bayesian techniques to produce small area population estimates using administrative datasets (funded by GRO Scotland). The former work illustrates the principle of borrowing strength (via Bayesian methods) to make life expectancy estimates for small areas, when conventional estimates may be subject to instability. The latter study, funded by GRO Scotland, investigated possible alternatives to Census based population estimates (known as the SAPE estimates) for 6505 Scotland datazones, using administrative datasets with comprehensive population coverage such as the NHSCR and DWP customer populations.

Illustrative Outputs

 


III Methods for Public Health Needs Assessment
This work focuses on strategic analysis and health care profiles for small areas and GP practices in NE London, in collaboration with local public health departments. This work involves use of a variety of health indicators (mortality rates, hospital admission rates, population prevalence, etc.) to inform public health needs assessment. Research outputs include small area analysis of premature mortality using years of life lost indicators, and geographic interpolation methods to develop small area estimates of health indicators (such as the psychosis prevalence rate in outer North East London LSOAs) from the Quality Outcomes Framework dataset for GP practices.

Illustrative Outputs

  • Congdon P (2013) Interpolation between spatial frameworks: an application of process convolution to estimating neighbourhood disease prevalence. Stat Methods Med Res. 2012 May 2. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Congdon P (2013) Modelling small-area inequality in premature mortality using years of life lost rates. Journal of Geographical Systems, 15 (2): 149–167

 


IV Spatial Statistics in Geographic Epidemiology
This strand of research considers application of statistical methods to analyse spatial variations in population mortality and chronic disease outcomes. This includes work to explain geographic variations in self-harm and suicide, to assess spatial clustering of disease, and to disease prevalence estimation for small areas. A particular aspect of this work is the use of Bayesian techniques.

Illustrative Outputs

PhD Supervision

Recent PhD Students

  • Alison Copeland 2011. Socioeconomic and Community Influences on Potentially Avoidable Emergency Admissions to Hospital for Older People in London
  • Michael Grayer 2011. Analysis of Variation in Small-area Life Expectancy within London, 2000–2008

I welcome expressions of interest and enquiries from potential PhD students who would like to work on research projects related to my fields of expertise, including quantitative and GIS applications to area health and demography.

Public engagement

Collaboration with local health agencies in strategic analysis of health need, health demand and healthcare.

Collaboration with GRO Scotland on Development of Micro-Area Population Estimates

  • Editorial Board (Spatial Statistics), Springer Handbook of Regional Science, 2013
  • Editorial Board Member, Journal of Biometrics & Biostatistics; Editorial Board of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health;
  • Refereeing grant applications/project reviewing on behalf of ESRC, NHS Service Delivery and Organisation R&D Programme, Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Arts and Humanities Research Board; Research Grants Council (Hong Kong); Health Research Council of New Zealand; ESRC-NWO Bilateral Research Scheme, Chief Scientist Office (Edinburgh) HSR Training Scheme.
  • Referee Panel ESRC/MRC Joint Studentship and Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme;
  • Chartered Statistician;
  • Elected Member, International Statistical Institute
  • Guest Editor, Computational Statistics & Data Analysis (Special Issue, Spatial Statistics)
  • External Reviewer NORFACE(Research Funding Agency Cooperation in Europe)
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