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TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG4002Full year4No

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aids the transition to university by developing basic learning skills including reading and essay-writing as well as field observation and recording, through lectures and small-group tutorial work. In the Green London Project students explore urban environmental management in London, developing their social capital by working in small groups, becoming part of the community of geographers and environmental scientists at QMUL and learning how research, including ¿citizen science¿, can impact on organisations that are managing green spaces in London.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geography in the WorldGEG4003Semester 14No

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on academic geography and the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as engaged with the world and situated within wider society. We address key geographical practices, explore the relevance and application of academic geography, and consider new developments in citizen science and activist, participatory and public geography. The module includes a field trip to the Royal Geographical Society and employability lectures.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGEG4004Full year4No

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

People and the EnvironmentGEG4005Semester 14Yes

People and the Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to key environmental issues from scientific, economic, social and cultural perspectives. The module encourages an appreciation of the complex and multifactoral nature of environmental problems; students will gain an understanding of the main global environmental systems and how these impact on and are impacted by human activity. They will also gain an appreciation of the range of approaches within geography that can be employed to study the relationship between people and their environment.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Cities and Regions in TransitionGEG4006Semester 24No

Cities and Regions in Transition

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cities and Regions in Transition will enable BA Human Geography students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of contemporary change in the UK. Key themes to be addressed in seminar discussion include neo-liberalism, the North-South divide, culture-led urban regeneration, urban heritage and identity, migration and urban health. Students will be assessed via (i) a learning log to demonstrate their critical engagement with reading in preparation for the seminars and (ii) an additional essay to be completed after the fieldtrip on GEG4106.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Reinventing BritainGEG4106Semester 24No

Reinventing Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines geographical implications of changes across the economic, social, cultural and political landscapes of Britain over the last three decades, focused on a field trip North West England. Key themes include: Britain¿s long-standing North-South divide; uneven geographies of deindustrialisation; culture, heritage and regeneration; geographies of migration and identity; and health inequalities. The module is delivered through lectures and fieldwork, introducing and make connections between theoretical perspectives including economic, social, cultural, political and urban geographies.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Global WorldsGEG4112Semester 24No

Global Worlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Cathy Mcilwaine
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 1 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Fieldwork in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG4204Semester 24Yes

Fieldwork in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to fieldwork skills for physical geographers and environmental scientists. You will be able to use a range of field techniques to investigate the physical landscape, soils and sediments, river systems and hydrology and also the impact of and management of human activity on the natural environment. The module is delivered through lectures, laboratory/classroom practical exercises and fieldwork exercises, both actual and virtual (e.g. using Google Earth). Actual fieldwork may take place on-campus, off-campus on day trips, during a residential field trip, or any combination of these.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Earth Surface ScienceGEG4209Semester 24Yes

Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Transferable Skills for GeographersGEG4444Full year4No

Transferable Skills for Geographers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Geographical Information SystemsGEG5102Full year5Yes

Geographical Information Systems

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ARCVIEW. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS. The module will emphasise the applications of GIS both realised, within the module, and potential, within the wider geographical remit.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103Full year5No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester A, students will attend weekly lectures that introduce key qualitative research techniques. In addition, students will work on an action research project in the local community to develop these skills and produce a final report to summarise their findings. In both Semesters A and B, these research foundations are further developed through tutorials that are designed to prepare students to do their own IGS.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 3 pm

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103BSemester 25No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students studying away from Queen Mary in Semester 1 and who would like to prepare for GEG6000 Independent Geographical Study (IGS) in Semester 2 when they return. The module is delivered through tutorials/small group teaching and focuses on equipping students with the knowledge and skills required to design an independent piece of research (the IGS). The programme focuses on how to select a feasible research topic, review academic literature, justify and select appropriate research methodology, make pragmatic decisions about research access, sites and timeline, consider the ethical dimensions of research and make appropriate risk assessments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Geography, Identity, BelongingGEG5104Semester 25No

Geography, Identity, Belonging

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: GEG6104
Prerequisite: GEG5126,GEG5127

This module explores contemporary geographies of identity and belonging in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It focuses on key questions of national identity, multiculturalism and migration in relation to social, political and economic change in these contexts and their implications for social inclusion, conflict resolution and citizenship. It addresses varied approaches to culture, identity and belonging in these two deeply interconnected but also distinctive places through fieldwork as well as lectures and seminars. The module thus provides a strongly empirical basis for critically addressing current approaches to the geographies of culture and identity in academic theory, public debate and social and cultural policy in other contexts. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American CityGEG5125Semester 25Yes

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5110

Boston is a city that has undergone a series of dramatic transformations over the past three centuries. From being a key site of the American Revolution's rejection of British colonial rule, to the mass migration of Irish, Black American and other groups to the city in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, through to more recent processes of economic decline and reinvention as a hub of biotechnology, it is a city that has been at the forefront of American political, economic and social change. This module focuses on the changing historical geographies of Boston from the colonial period to the present day examining key processes which have shaped the city. Teaching and learning begins in the classroom through a series of lectures and workshops examining aspects of the city's historical geography and the sources used to study them, and planning group-based project work. It culminates in a week-long field course in Boston at the end of the semester. Work in Boston involves visiting museums, walking heritage trails, exploring localities and neighborhoods and meeting with researchers, experts and heritage practitioners in order to complete group projects. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Cultural GeographiesGEG5126Semester 25Yes

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography . The module is assessed by 100% coursework: an interpretive coursework exercise (2000 words) and a 3000 word coursework essay.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Society and SpaceGEG5127Semester 15Yes

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Drawing mainly, though not wholly, on examples from the UK, this module explores the social geographies of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and sexuality at a variety of scales. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: Changing class relations in the British countryside; rural poverty and homelessness; racial inequality and changing ethnic identities in the UK; London's new migrant division of labour; gentrification; homelessness and the politics of public space; the gendering of urban space; and the geographies of sexuality. The module is assessed by 100% coursework: a field walk and 2000 word report in the form of a Wikipedia entry, and 3000 word course work essay.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGEG5128Semester 25Yes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Economic GeographiesGEG5129Semester 15Yes

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Erica Pani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4112

This module aims to explore the diversity and inequalities of economic development experiences globally, as well as within countries and among nations. It will examine some core issues in relation to how economic concerns of capital, production, exchange, valuation and consumption play out in practice with reference to a range of different cases studies. It will also address ongoing debates around economic crisis and complex socioeconomic geographies of post-recessionary growth.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Place, Space and Health GeographiesGEG5130Semester 25Yes

Place, Space and Health Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Mod Reg Dept Contacts - Dept Of Geography
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module critically engages with the geographies of health and place. The module outlines key theoretical concepts shaping the study of health by geographers and sketches a short history of the importance of place to this. Having located the geographies of health and place within their intellectual milieu, the module explores a variety of theoretical and empirical case studies that tease apart the uneven geographies of health and health care at a variety of spatial scales, and in so doing, raises questions of inequity and justice.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 12 pm - 2 pm

Contemporary London: Life in the Global MetropolisGEG5131Semester 15Yes

Contemporary London: Life in the Global Metropolis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines London as a global city, exploring how its people, economy and ways of life are profoundly shaped by their connections with the rest of the world. Focusing on the themes of difference, inequality and lived experience, it will examine how economic, social and cultural processes are reshaping the metropolis and the lives of those who call themselves Londoners. The city will be our classroom ¿ we will explore its diverse neighbourhoods and watch, listen and talk to its people.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical, 15.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Geographies of BiomedicineGEG5134Semester 15Yes

Geographies of Biomedicine

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between health and biomedicine, and how this varies across different spatial, social and technological contexts. It seeks to teach students how a geographical perspective can be used to critically interrogate the ways in which biomedicine is transforming the geographies of medical research, health and healthcare. Key topics that will be considered include: organ trafficking, biological citizenship, neuroscience, genetic screening, and inequitable access to pharmaceutical drug

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Environmental Research MethodsGEG5212Semester 15Yes

Environmental Research Methods

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides training in key research methods for physical geography and environmental science, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include practice in laboratory and field techniques, as well as data analysis and interpretation, digital cartography and reporting skills, delivered through lectures, laboratory practicals and a residential field course. With GEG5214 Research Design and GEG5213 Advanced Environmental Research Methods it provides a foundation for Level 6 independent research projects.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6: Thursday 1 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 4, 5, 6: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11: Friday 1 pm - 4 pm

Advanced Environmental Research SkillsGEG5213Semester 25Yes

Advanced Environmental Research Skills

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides further training in selected research techniques, building upon GEG5212 Environmental Research Methods. To develop the skills they need for Level 6 independent research projects, students will select from a portfolio of ¿short course options¿ providing opportunities to learn and practice laboratory and field methods, based on research strengths within the School of Geography. Delivery is tailored to the specific needs of each short course and will typically involve small-group laboratory, computing and/or local fieldwork.

Assessment: 80.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 9 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 2 pm - 5 pm

Research DesignGEG5214Full year5Yes

Research Design

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module develops students' understanding of approaches to scientific research, building on knowledge and skills acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers & Environmental Scientists. This will include literature review, developing research questions and testable hypotheses, feasibility studies, risk assessment procedures and the management of research projects. Through this module students will choose a topic for their Level 6 Independent Geographical Study or Project in Environmental Science and be guided through the process of developing and submitting a project proposal.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern AlpsGEG5220Semester 25Yes

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the most rapidly uplifting orogens on Earth, driven by an interplay between active tectonics, climate and erosion. This collision of forces, creates a remarkably diverse environment, characterized by an 800 km long, 3000 m high mountain belt, a strong west-east climatic divide, active glacierized headwaters and labile piedmont braided rivers and alluvial fans. This spectacular, and geologically young environment provides a rich natural laboratory for the study of the physical environment, in which the landforms and pattern of landscape evolution are tangibly connected to the physical processes driving sediment transfers from source to sink. This module will offer students an insight into the dynamic landscapes of Alpine environments and the research methods used to study them. Particular emphasis will be placed on investigating the processes and products of glacial and fluvial systems in order to understand how they might respond to tectonic and climate drivers. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Teaching and learning will begin in the classroom, through a series of lectures and workshops examining the environments and processes of the Southern Alps. This will involve some group-based preparatory research design, and culminates in a 10-day trip to NZ, based on three-centres offering contrasting landscapes and suites of processes: a) Franz Josef and the west-coast glaciers; b) the Queenstown lake district; and c) Mount Cook Village. These venues will provide opportunities for investigative research on active glaciers, tectonic geomorphology, and a chance to study dynamic glacio-fluvial braided rivers and their associated hazards. Field teaching will involve a mix of staff-led and group-based project work, with a particular focus on research design and data interpretation. Please note that students will be required to fund their own airfares to NZ (from £800, which offers the flexibility to extend their stay through the Easter Vacation) and contribute a fee to cover the costs of travel and subsistence in NZ (c. £650-750).

Assessment: 60.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Geospatial ScienceGEG5223Semester 25Yes

Geospatial Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: GEG5102
Prerequisite: GEG4004

This module aims to develop an understanding of the theory and methods involved in the creation, storage, analysis and presentation of geospatial data, building on knowledge acquired in GEG4004 Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists. Using industry standard software, the module will provide the knowledge and skills to tackle advanced problem solving using Geographic Information Systems, providing a key foundation for independent research projects at Level 6 and within the workplace.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Ecosystem ScienceGEG5224Semester 25No

Ecosystem Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "GEG4005, GEG4209"

This module explores the principles and fundamental processes that govern the structure and function of ecosystems. We put ecosystems into context, examining their global and regional distribution in relation to climate, geology and landforms. Next, we explore the processes that exchange materials and energy between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, with a focus on the cycling of water, carbon and nutrients. Finally, we examine the temporal and spatial dynamics of ecosystems, and how natural disturbance events and humans alter ecosystem processes and dynamics.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Tuesday 9 am - 1 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 8: Thursday 11 am - 3 pm

GeomorphologyGEG5225Semester 15No

Geomorphology

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4209

This module introduces key concepts in geomorphology and explores the fundamental processes that drive the development of landforms at the Earth's surface. The module encompasses a range of geomorphological systems and processes, from gravity-driven mass movement and glacial processes in high altitude environments, to flow and sediment transport processes in river channels. The module will cover key drivers (e.g. energy, weathering processes) and fundamental concepts such as equilibrium, thresholds, complexity, equifinality, feedbacks, magnitude-frequency relationships through lectures and practical work.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

An Independent Geographical StudyGEG6000Full year6No

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5103 GEG5211

As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Readings in Geography: Geographies of DemocracyGEG6005Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Democracy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Co-requisite GEG6133

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Democracy allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6133 Geographies of Democracy by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geographies of Democracy sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6133 Geographies of Democracy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and SocietyGEG6006Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Co-requisite GEG6134

The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module will allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society module by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geography, Technology and Society sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Readings in Geography: Contemporary IndiaGEG6007Semester 16No

Readings in Geography: Contemporary India

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: Co-requisite GEG6129

Readings in Geography: Contemporary India allows students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the concepts and events that they are studying within the co-requisite module GEG6129 Contemporary India: Politics, society and economy. Students will undertake an extended piece of writing (6000 words) based on independent reading and research that is supported through multimedia e-learning resources, two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Ice Age BritainGEG5226Semester 15No

Ice Age Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4209

This module investigates the nature and causes of the climatic fluctuations of the last 2.5 million years - the Ice Age - focusing on the rich record of the British Isles. Following a contextual overview of global climate change it focuses on the use of terrestrial sedimentary and biological evidence to reconstruct and understand past environmental and climate change, using case studies from the British Isles to explore the response of the landscape, biota and humans to these major climatic changes.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 2 pm

The Anthropocene: Between the Natural & Social SciencesGEG5227Semester 15No

The Anthropocene: Between the Natural & Social Sciences

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Anthropocene offers a controversial new framework exploring connections between people and environment. This module develops from Level 4, evaluating how we define the Anthropocene, how it is considered in a broader context of the biological and social evolution of humans, and its importance in understanding contemporary Earth systems. Exploring planetary boundaries and dynamics of Anthropocenic Earth, and placing these in social and (geo)political contexts, this module challenges you to consider your role as a citizen of the Anthropocene.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American CityGEG6125Semester 26No

Boston Reworked: The Making of a North American City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5126 or GEG5127 or GEG5128 or GEG5129 or GEG5113

Boston is a city that has undergone a series of dramatic transformations over the past three centuries. From being a key site of the American Revolution's rejection of British colonial rule, to the mass migration of Irish, Black American and other groups to the city in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, through to more recent processes of economic decline and reinvention as a hub of biotechnology, it is a city that has been at the forefront of American political, economic and social change. This module focuses on the changing historical geographies of Boston from the colonial period to the present day examining key processes which have shaped the city. Teaching and learning begins in the classroom through a series of lectures and workshops examining aspects of the city's historical geography and the sources used to study them, and planning group-based project work. It culminates in a week-long field course in Boston at the end of the semester. Work in Boston involves visiting museums, walking heritage trails, exploring localities and neighborhoods and meeting with researchers, experts and heritage practitioners in order to complete group projects.Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economyGEG6129Semester 16No

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module examines significant shifts in South Asian politics, development and society with a particular focus on India. Students will cover nationalism and the "invention" of India, the politics of violence and nonviolence on the sub-continent, processes of economic liberalisation and development in India and its Diaspora. More specifically the module will encourage students to engage with questions concerning: everyday experiences of violence and nonviolence with respect to Hindu nationalism, and Islamist activism in a post 9/11 world; the rise of the middle classes, India¿s cities and citizenship experiences; processes of development including the role of the state and civil society/political society; the nature of political and social transformation in light of caste policies of affirmative action and experiences of education and (un/under)employment and finally the South Asian Diaspora and everyday life in the UK. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Geography, Identity, BelongingGEG6104Semester 26No

Geography, Identity, Belonging

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: GEG5104
Prerequisite: GEG5103 or GEG5110

This module explores contemporary geographies of identity and belonging in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It focuses on key questions of national identity, multiculturalism and migration in relation to social, political and economic change in these contexts and their implications for social inclusion, conflict resolution and citizenship. It addresses varied approaches to culture, identity and belonging in these two deeply interconnected but also distinctive places through fieldwork as well as lectures and seminars. The module thus provides a strongly empirical basis for critically addressing current approaches to the geographies of culture and identity in academic theory, public debate and social and cultural policy in other contexts. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Globalisation and Regional DevelopmentGEG6121Semester 26Yes

Globalisation and Regional Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Adrian Smith
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the ways in which regional development is related to processes of globalisation and industrial change, The first part of the module introduces students to key frameworks and associated debates linking globalisation and industrial restructuring that have been deployed by economic geographers, and scholars in development studies and economic sociology. A primary focus is on global production networks and global value chains, the main actors involved in them, and their impacts on regional development. The module emphasises a political-economic analysis or globalisation, industrial change and regional development. In the second part of the module these issues are explored through a focus on both western and eastern European regional development, the relations between Europe and North Africa, and the ways in which regional economies are increasingly linked in global production networks, with important implications for their development.

Assessment:
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 4 pm - 6 pm

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGEG6130Semester 26No

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Critical Health GeographiesGEG6131Semester 16Yes

Critical Health Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Critical Health Geographies will enable students to deepen their understanding of, and critical response to, health-related topics covered in the Level 5 module GEG511 Health, Biomedicine and Society. Students will undertake in-depth reading of the research literature on a particular theme coupled with a mini research project on the same topic. It is anticipated that students will develop their own ideas for the mini research project with the guidance of the module tutor. Learning will primarily take place through independent study and research, supported by group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report. This will comprise a 3,000 word 'literature review' submitted part way through the module for formative feedback and a final report of 6,000 words, incorporating a revised version of the 'literature review' and a discussion of the findings of the student's research project. Good achievement (2.1 and above) on GEG5113 is a necessary prerequisite for the module.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GEG6132Semester 16Yes

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5102

This module explores advanced issues in relation to the principles, techniques and applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) within the wider geographical remit (e.g. advanced spatial analysis, location-allocation models, interoperability and exchange of data between different systems, etc.). It complements the GIS training offered in levels 4 and 5 of and provides an opportunity to students to consolidate and expand their knowledge about GIS.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geographies of DemocracyGEG6133Semester 26Yes

Geographies of Democracy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the geographies of democracy and related debates about the democracy of geography as a discipline. The module will start by looking at what we mean by democracy (demos-kratos/people-power), the history of the idea and related practices, the different forms of democracy (direct/representative and newer debates about deliberative democracy and post democracy), the role of political parties and importantly, the importance of geography to these developments. The module will explicate the wider connections to politics and political philosophy (looking at republicanism, liberalism and communitarianism) with particular focus on British political historical-geography. In the latter parts of the module the focus will turn to contemporary challenges including the democratic deficit, rebuilding parties and populism, active citizenship and community organising. In parallel, the module will explore the way in which the discipline of geography (as manifest in universities and schools) has been subject to currents for democratic change in relation to subject matter, research methods, teaching methods and public engagement.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Geography, Technology and SocietyGEG6134Semester 26No

Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will develop students' critical engagement with the geographies of knowledge, technology and society. The module will discuss the theoretical and conceptual fabric of geographies of science, paying close attention to its development through studies in the history and sociology of science and Science & Technology Studies (STS). It will then apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to understanding a select number of case study examples of hubs of scientific innovation in the life sciences and Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Development GeographiesGEG6138Semester 16Yes

Development Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment:
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Culture Space and PowerGEG6139Semester 16No

Culture Space and Power

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment:
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Economic Futures: Malaysia EmergingGEG6140Semester 26Yes

Economic Futures: Malaysia Emerging

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gale Raj-Reichert
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: "GEG5103, GEG5129"

This innovative fieldwork based module aims to bridge the study of `economic¿, `labour¿, and `development¿ geographies. The core themes are: 1) Malaysia¿s integration into the global and regional production networks of the electronics industry; 2) the state of Malaysia as post-developmental; 3) the role of foreign migrant workers in the stabilisation of the labour market; and 4) the embedding of race politics in the cultural and economic geographies. These themes will be explored through field case studies in Penang and Kuala Lumpur. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Cold EnvironmentsGEG6202Semester 26No

Cold Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5206

The module selectively addresses processes active in the glacial and the periglacial environment: glaciogenic (both ice and meltwater) erosion, transport, sedimentation, permafrost and ground ice and their effects on fluvial, aeolian and gravitational processes. For each of these processes the resulting landforms, both in active and in fossil form, will be treated, together with features resulting from converging processes. Examples are drawn from the Arctic, the Antarctic and high mountain ranges, while examples of fossil features are mainly drawn from western Europe.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Environmental HazardsGEG6203Semester 16Yes

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Project in Environmental ScienceGEG6212Full year6Yes

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5211

An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 10: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Quaternary PalaeoenvironmentsGEG6213Semester 26No

Quaternary Palaeoenvironments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Robert Storrar
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module aims to give students an in-depth understanding of selected themes and aspects of current research in Quaternary science. It will explore continuous records of climate and the causes of the changes observed. Set in this framework is a detailed consideration of the European Quaternary palaeoenvironmental record. Patterns of glaciation, river activity, human activity and changes in the biota in Britain and Europe in response to climate forcing will be investigated and the current state of understanding of the correlation of terrestrial and oceanic sequences will be assessed.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 10 am - 12 pm

Science and Politics of Climate ChangeGEG6214Semester 16Yes

Science and Politics of Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines one of the most contentious issues facing society in the 21st Century. The module studies the operation of the global climate system, with an emphasis on different aspects of human intervention, and possible implications for changing climates. This module investigates how climate change is (mis-)communicated by primary scientists, politicians, businesses, individuals and communities, and how climate change is used as a geopolitical tool to influence decision-making at individual to supra-national scales.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 4 pm - 6 pm

Integrated Catchment ManagementGEG6218Semester 26No

Integrated Catchment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Flood risk is increasing at the same time as our rising demand for water. And European legislation, now transposed into UK law, also requires our rivers to achieve good ecological status. There is growing recognition by environmental policy makers and managers that floods, low flows and water quality need to be managed in an integrated way if sustainable solutions are to be found. This module builds on the knowledge of catchment-scale processes gained from GEG5203 Earth System Cycles and applies this knowledge to the practical management of the water environment. Students will gain an understanding of: the issues facing managers of water resources and the water environment; the legislative and policy drivers for management; and the latest approaches being implemented to achieve sustainable and integrated management in the catchment context.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern AlpsGEG6220Semester 26Yes

Alpine Environments: Physical Processes in the NZ Southern Alps

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Southern Alps of New Zealand are one of the most rapidly uplifting orogens on Earth, driven by an interplay between active tectonics, climate and erosion. This collision of forces, creates a remarkably diverse environment, characterized by an 800 km long, 3000 m high mountain belt, a strong west-east climatic divide, active glacierized headwaters and labile piedmont braided rivers and alluvial fans. This spectacular, and geologically young environment provides a rich natural laboratory for the study of the physical environment, in which the landforms and pattern of landscape evolution are tangibly connected to the physical processes driving sediment transfers from source to sink. This module will offer students an insight into the dynamic landscapes of Alpine environments and the research methods used to study them. Particular emphasis will be placed on investigating the processes and products of glacial and fluvial systems in order to understand how they might respond to tectonic and climate drivers. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Teaching and learning will begin in the classroom, through a series of lectures and workshops examining the environments and processes of the Southern Alps. This will involve some group-based preparatory research design, and culminates in a 10-day trip to NZ, based on three-centres offering contrasting landscapes and suites of processes: a) Franz Josef and the west-coast glaciers; b) the Queenstown lake district; and c) Mount Cook Village. These venues will provide opportunities for investigative research on active glaciers, tectonic geomorphology, and a chance to study dynamic glacio-fluvial braided rivers and their associated hazards. Field teaching will involve a mix of staff-led and group-based project work, with a particular focus on research design and data interpretation. Please note that students will be required to fund their own airfares to NZ (from £800, which offers the flexibility to extend their stay through the Easter Vacation) and contribute a fee to cover the costs of travel and subsistence in NZ (c. £650-750).

Assessment: 60.0% Practical, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG6221Semester 26No

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will work independently to identify, research and review a wide range of contemporary, primary literature in a chosen area of Environmental Science or Physical Geography. Through a series of small group seminars students will be given the opportunity to discuss and present their findings to both their peers and a member of academic staff. Through these seminars they will also receive feedback on their work.

Broad research themes will be identified at the beginning of the semester (during module registration and advising) to reflect the research interests and expertise of staff available to lead seminars. Students will select a theme within which they can choose their own research topic and will be allocated to a seminar group. The seminars are either staff or student led. In order to benefit from these seminars students must prepare for them in advance and be prepared to critically discuss their peers¿ work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystemsGEG6222Semester 26No

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Geo-ecology is an interdisciplinary science that studies organisms, air, water and land as interacting components of a single geo-ecosystem. A central tenet is that components of the system must be considered in relation to one another and to the larger whole, rather than in isolation. Geo-ecosystems are 'messy' and cause-and-effect is often cyclical rather than linear. In this module, we will examine selected topics in this field, taking a practical approach through the use of spatial data and models. You will learn how to analyse spatial patterns in the landscape and to investigate the underlying processes and interactions. Developing this approach of `systems thinking¿ is vital to understanding and, where possible, managing environmental issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGEG6223Semester 16Yes

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5222

The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGEG710USemester 27No

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Desk StudyGEG705USemester 27Yes

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGEG708UFull year7Yes

Individual Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students are encouraged to undertake their Individual Research Project in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation. The theme for the Individual Research Project is selected by the student in collaboration with the module organiser and, where appropriate, with the practitioner organisation in order to ensure that the project and practitioner link matches the research interests and career aspirations of the student. Students not wishing to link with a practitioner organisation can opt to undertake a free-standing research project of their choice, subject to approval by the module organiser. In either case, the project is undertaken between Semester B of Level 6 and Semester B of Level 7, allowing the main research to be completed during the summer vacation between Levels 6 and 7. Each student is allocated an academic advisor from the MSci academic staff to ensure that they receive appropriate academic guidance during the research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental ScienceGEG709UFull year7No

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGEG710USemester 27Yes

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biogeosciences and ecosystem servicesGEG713USemester 27Yes

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Flood Risk Management and ModellingGEG714USemester 27Yes

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is divided into two linked elements. The first explores the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are examined and novel management options for reducing flood risk (including strategic rural land management and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) are critically reviewed. Flood protection in London is explored through a field trip to the Thames Barrier and potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are reviewed. The second component of the module is focussed on flood risk modelling. A combination of lecture and practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

River Assessment and RestorationGEG717USemester 17Yes

River Assessment and Restoration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide the key knowledge and understanding at an advanced level necessary to support the development of management strategies for rivers along the catchment to coast continuum. Based upon an understanding of the multi-dimensional connectivity of fluvial systems, the module focuses on themes such as sediment and vegetation dynamics, river and floodplain process-form relationships, environmental flows, ecohydraulics and particular issues relating to constrained urban environments. Based on a solid scientific underpinning, the module introduces the legislative context, methods of field survey and assessment, and integrated approaches to the sustainable management of river systems, their flood plains and estuaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Data AnalysisGEG725USemester 17Yes

Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of numerical, statistical land modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in specific approaches to data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

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