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Dr Sven Lukas, Diplom (MSc) (Bochum, Germany), PhD (St Andrews)

Reader in Quaternary Sedimentology

email: s.lukas (at) qmul.ac.uk
Tel: +44 020 7882 8417 (direct line) +44 020 7882 2720
Location: Geography Building, Room 113

Profile

Sven Lukas

The overarching principle of my work has been to study landform-sediment assemblages (glacial landsystems) at modern glaciers and use the knowledge gained from them as modern analogues to enable a holistic understanding of how Quaternary ice masses operated and to reconstruct the environmental parameters in the past. I work at all scales, from small corrie glacier to ice sheet, in Arctic and Alpine environments, incorporating timescales from 100- 104 years. In order to shed light on the timing of events and process rates, I have employed a large number of geochronological techniques over the years, especially optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating.

Recent key publications

  • Lukas, S., Benn, D. I., Boston, C. M., Brook, M. S., Coray, S., Evans, D. J. A., Graf, A., Kellerer-Pirklbauer-Eulenstein, A., Kirkbride, M. P., Krabbendam, M., Lovell, H., Machiedo, M., Mills, S. C., Nye, K., Reinardy, B. T. I., Ross, F. H., and Signer, M. (2013). Clast shape analysis and clast transport paths in glacial environments: A critical review of methods and the role of lithology Earth-Science Reviews 121, 96–116.
  • Lukas, S., Graf, A., Coray, S., and Schlüchter, C. (2012). Genesis, stability and preservation potential of large lateral moraines of Alpine valley glaciers - towards a unifying theory based on Findelengletscher, Switzerland. Quaternary Science Reviews 38, 27–48.
  • Lukas, S., Preusser, F., Anselmetti, F. S., and Tinner, W. (2012). Testing the potential of luminescence dating of high-alpine lake sediments. Quaternary Geochronology 8, 23–32.
  • Lukas, S., and Bradwell, T. (2010). Reconstruction of a lateglacial (Younger Dryas) mountain ice field in Sutherland, NW Scotland, and its palaeoclimatic implications. Journal of Quaternary Science 25, 567–580.

 

Awards

  • January 2012 Lewis Penny Medal of the Quaternary Research Association for my outstanding contributions to British Quaternary stratigraphy
  • June 2007 Newbigin Award of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society for the most highly commended article of Vol. 122 (2006), Scottish Geographical Journal
  • July 2006 Paul Woldstedt Award of the German Quaternary Association for the exceptional contributions my PhD thesis has made to Quaternary science

Teaching

Mission statement

To me, teaching at university is highly enjoyable and a key component of my daily activities. In teaching, theory meets practice on the one hand (i.e. where theoretical concepts can be applied to actual scientific and practical questions, e.g. in computer and laboratory practicals) and aids a much deeper level of understanding through experiencing the real world through fieldwork. Therefore, my teaching interleaves the theoretical aspects through lectures, seminars and tutorials with practical aspects such as computer and laboratory practicals and field-based exercises and projects. My teaching generally centres around my own research interests and expertise, which means that my teaching style is always enthusiastic (because I enjoy what I teach), up-to-date (because I know my field and the current debates, for example) and problem-orientated (because I believe this is a transferable skill that will be invaluable on the job market after graduation).

I have gained a large amount of teaching experience at four institutions in three countries during my career. All these institutions enabled me to embed the philosophy of research-based teaching into their curriculum. My experience spans the whole spectrum from first-year undergraduate teaching through to PhD student supervision, including all forms of teaching (lectures, laboratory and computer practicals, field-teaching, seminars, tutorials and paper discussions). I have developed three of my own courses within BSc programmes during my time as a lecturer and have been able to develop my own specialist area within an MSc course at the University Centre on Svalbard (UNIS) where I am a permanent guest lecturer as well.

 

Some excerpts from past student feedback on the main modules I convene:

  • “Sven was a very good lecturer and made the module very interesting.”
  • “Lecturers were all engaged and enthusiastic.”

(GEG4208 Methods for Environmental Research, 2012–2013)

  • “Lecturers all friendly and approachable.”
  • “Enjoyable module with well-linked lectures and practicals.”

(GEG5202 Digital Worlds, 2011–2012)

  • “Very detailed with interesting discussion of opposing theories.”
  • “It is interesting and the lecturers are enthusiastic.”

(GEG6202 Cold Environments, 2012–2013)

 

Modules taught:

Research

Research interests:

My research focuses on the understanding of the timing of glacier-climate interactions and its effects on the shaping of landscapes over longer (e.g. Younger Dryas, Holocene) and shorter timescales (e.g. “Little Ice Age”, recent). The overarching principle of my research is the combination of multiple methods to arrive at a holistic understanding of the complexity of glaciated palaeoenvironments.


Rapid climate change and its effects on mountain glaciation – past, present and future
As recognised by the IPCC, mountain glaciers are amongst the most sensitive indicators of climate change. It is therefore crucial to investigate the forcing on, and timescales of, glacier response to rapid climate change, as the latter will have a large impact on human societies worldwide. I have focused on the Younger Dryas and early Holocene glaciation in mountains across Europe because it is considered the key period for rapid climate change. The aim of my research is to use mountain glaciers in order to provide data on climatic boundary conditions in glaciated areas, most importantly former precipitation totals (Benn and Lukas, 2006; Lukas, 2007a; Lukas and Bradwell, 2010). Such data cannot be reconstructed using biological or other proxies recovered for example from ice-, marine or lake-cores farther away from glaciated areas. By covering larger parts of mountain areas a large-scale and representative picture of past glacier-climate interactions will be developed. Such data are urgently required to tune and refine numerical models used to predict future climate change as the majority of such models at present relies on the relatively short time-span for which observational climate data are available. This shortcoming can only be overcome if palaeo-data can be provided from glaciated areas for which no such data exist from other archives.

Study sites: Scottish Highlands; European Alps; Jostedalsbreen, Norway.

Optically- and infrared-stimulated luminescence (OSL/IRSL) dating of glacial sediments
In any Quaternary science discipline it is crucial to establish the timing of climatically-significant events by applying numerical dating. In glacial environments, however, it is rarely possible to determine the timing of events with well-established approaches such as radiocarbon dating, for example, due to the lack of suitable organics. I have applied luminescence dating to glacial, glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments in lowland and mountain areas to provide time constraint on the timing of climatically-important events, e.g. glacier/ice sheet advances. While some of this work has been largely methodological, highlighting the complications in some glacial systems (Lukas et al., 2007a), recent work has shown that modern Alpine ice-marginal and glaciolacustrine sediments are reasonably well-bleached and suitable for OSL-dating (Lukas et al., 2012). My main aim is to systematically explore the potential of applying luminescence dating to glacial and associated sediments in other mountain locations to provide direct dates for sediments which can usually only be widely bracketed by radiocarbon ages. This interest has culminated in the build-up of dedicated luminescence laboratory at QMUL.

Current study sites: Scottish Highlands; selected glacier forelands and lake settings in the Central European Alps; Swiss Midlands; Svalbard

Ice-marginal processes of moraine formation and preservation under different climatic conditions
Understanding the formation of ice-marginal moraines is of crucial importance to correctly interpreting former glacier extents and dynamics. While most sedimentological studies have concentrated on examples of push moraines my research investigates the processes by which material is delivered to the moraine, the role of widespread gravitational and fluvial processes in moraine formation and how the final landform is remodelled by the meltout of dead-ice bodies. For this purpose I have chosen to study modern glacier margins in different climatic settings to identify controls of permafrost and dead-ice content on the modification of moraines (Lukas et al., 2005, 2007b). The aims of my work are to  (a) provide a reference frame against which data from palaeoenvironments can be compared and interpreted (Lukas, 2005, 2007b) and (b) use a combination of sedimentological techniques to elucidate processes of moraine formation (e.g. Reinardy and Lukas, 2009).  I have recently started to employ ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and DC resistivity in order to investigate glacial sedimentary structures within larger lateral moraine complexes where exposures are limited (e.g. Lukas and Sass, 2011). Sedimentology forms a key part of understanding processes of moraine formation, for example to reconstruct where and how clasts within a moraine got there in the first place and how to use this information to reconstruct glacier dynamics during moraine formation (Lukas et al., 2010; Lukas et al., 2012, 2013; Brook and Lukas, 2012).

Current study sites: Krundalen, Norway; several glaciers on Svalbard; NW Highlands, Scotland; Findelen- and Gornergletscher, Central Alps; Eastern Alps.

 

Key achievements

Through my work, I have:

1. Contributed to solving the mystery of ‘hummocky’ moraine formation in the British Isles

  • Lukas, S. (2005). A test of the englacial thrusting hypothesis of 'hummocky' moraine formation - case studies from the north-west Highlands, Scotland. Boreas, 34, 287-307.
  • Lukas, S. (2007). Englacial thrusting and (hummocky) moraine formation: a reply to comments by Graham et al. (2007). Boreas, 36, 108-113.

2. Led to fresh insights into Younger Dryas glacial landsystems and palaeoclimate in Scotland

  • Benn, D.I. and Lukas, S. (2006). Younger Dryas glacial landsystems in North West Scotland: An assessment of modern analogues and palaeoclimatic implications. Quaternary Science Reviews, 25, 2390-2408.
  • Lukas, S. and Bradwell, T. (2010). Reconstruction of a lateglacial (Younger Dryas) mountain ice field in Sutherland, NW Scotland, and its palaeoclimatic implications. Journal of Quaternary Science, 25, 567-580.

3. Advanced the understanding of moraine formation in modern Arctic and Alpine environments

  • Lukas, S., Nicholson, L.I., Ross, F.H. and Humlum, O. (2005). Formation, meltout processes and landscape alteration of high-arctic ice-cored moraines - examples from Nordenskiöld Land, central Spitsbergen. Polar Geography, 29, 157-187.
  • Lukas, S. (2012). Processes of annual moraine formation at a temperate alpine valley glacier: insights into glacier dynamics and climatic controls. Boreas, 41, 463-480.
  • Lukas, S., Graf, A., Coray, S. and Schlüchter, C. (2012). Genesis, stability and preservation potential of large lateral moraines of Alpine valley glaciers - towards a unifying theory based on Findelengletscher, Switzerland. Quaternary Science Reviews, 38, 27-48.

4. Pushed the range of the application of luminescence dating to glacial and associated sediments

  • Lukas, S., Spencer, J.Q.G., Robinson, R.A.J. and Benn, D.I. (2007). Problems associated with luminescence dating of Late Quaternary glacial sediments in the NW Scottish Highlands. Quaternary Geochronology, 2, 243–248.
  • Lukas, S., Preusser, F., Anselmetti, F.S. and Tinner, W. (2012). Testing the potential of luminescence dating of high-alpine lake sediments. Quaternary Geochronology, 8, 23-32.

 

Overview of classical 'hummocky moraine' in Coire na Phris, NW Highlands, Scotland (cf. Lukas and Benn, 2006).
Overview of classical 'hummocky moraine' in Coire na Phris, NW Highlands, Scotland (cf. Lukas and Benn, 2006).
Close-up of typical lithofacies associations found in 'hummocky' moraines in NW Scotland, but also elsewhere (cf. Lukas, 2005; Benn and Lukas, 2006).
Close-up of typical lithofacies associations found in 'hummocky' moraines in NW Scotland, but also elsewhere (cf. Lukas, 2005; Benn and Lukas, 2006).
Subglacial sediment emerging at the surface of Findelengletscher, Swiss Alps, from a shear or thrust plane (cf. Lukas, 2007b).
Subglacial sediment emerging at the surface of Findelengletscher, Swiss Alps, from a shear or thrust plane (cf. Lukas, 2007b).
Overview of the arcuate planform shape of shear or thrust planes on Findelengletscher. Note how the emerging material is transferred to the ice margin by flow and slumping, resulting in an uneven terrain underlain by buried ice on the left (bedrock towards the right).
Overview of the arcuate planform shape of shear or thrust planes on Findelengletscher. Note how the emerging material is transferred to the ice margin by flow and slumping, resulting in an uneven terrain underlain by buried ice on the left (bedrock towards the right).
 

Publications

Articles in peer-reviewed journals

  • 30. Lukas, S., Rother, H. 2016. Moraines versus till: Recommendations for the description, interpretation and classification of glacial landforms and sediments (in German with extended English abstract). E&G Quaternary Science Journal, in press.
  • 29. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S. 2016. Evidence for restricted Younger Dryas plateau ice in Glen Turret and implications for the age of the Turret Fan. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, in press.
  • 28. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Carr, S.J., 2015. A Younger Dryas plateau icefield in the Monadhliath, Scotland, and implications for regional palaeoclimate. Quaternary Science Reviews, 108, 139-162.
  • 27. Lovell, H., Fleming, E.J., Benn, D.I., Hubbard, B., Lukas, S., Flink, A.E., Noormets, R., 2015. Debris entrainment during tidewater glacier surges and implications for landform genesis. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, DOI: 10.1002/2015jf003509
  • 26. Lovell, H., Fleming, E.J., Benn, D.I., Hubbard, B., Lukas, S., Naegeli, K., 2015. Former dynamic behaviour of a cold-based valley glacier on Svalbard revealed by structural glaciology and basal ice investigations. Journal of Glaciology, 61, 309-328.
  • 25. Pellitero, R., Rea, B.R., Spagnolo, M., Bakke, J., Ivy-Ochs, S., Hughes, P., Lukas, S., Ribolini, A., 2015. A GIS tool for automatic calculation of glacier equilibrium-line altitudes. Computers and Geosciences, 82, 55-62.
  • 24. Lukas, S., Benn, D.I., Boston, C.M., Brook, M.S., Coray, S., Evans, D.J.A., Graf, A., Kellerer-Pirklbauer-Eulenstein, A., Kirkbride, M.P., Krabbendam, M., Lovell, H., Machiedo, M., Mills, S.C., Nye, K., Reinardy, B.T.I., Ross, F.H., Signer, M., 2013. Clast shape analysis and clast transport paths in glacial environments: A critical review of methods and the role of lithology. Earth-Science Reviews, 121, 96-116.
  • 23. Brook, M.S., Lukas, S., 2012. A revised approach to discriminating sediment transport histories in glacigenic sediments in a temperate alpine environment: a case study from Fox Glacier, New Zealand. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 37, 895-900.
  • 22. Lukas, S., 2012. Processes of annual moraine formation at a temperate alpine valley glacier: insights into glacier dynamics and climatic controls. Boreas, 41, 463-480.
  • 21. Lukas, S., Graf, A., Coray, S., Schlüchter, C., 2012. Genesis, stability and preservation potential of large lateral moraines of Alpine valley glaciers - towards a unifying theory based on Findelengletscher, Switzerland. Quaternary Science Reviews, 38, 27-48.
  • 20. Lukas, S., Preusser, F., Anselmetti, F.S., Tinner, W., 2012. Testing the potential of luminescence dating of high-alpine lake sediments. Quaternary Geochronology, 8, 23-32.
  • 19. Lukas, S., Sass, O., 2011. The formation of Alpine lateral moraines inferred from sedimentology and radar reflection patterns - a case study from Gornergletscher, Switzerland. Geological Society of London Special Publications, 354, 77–92.
  • 18. Carr, S.J., Lukas, S., Mills, S.C., 2010. Glacier reconstruction and mass-balance modelling as a geomorphic and palaeoclimatic tool. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 35, 1103–1115.
  • 17. Lukas, S., Bradwell, T., 2010. Reconstruction of a lateglacial (Younger Dryas) mountain ice field in Sutherland, NW Scotland, and its palaeoclimatic implications. Journal of Quaternary Science, 25, 567-580.
  • 16. Reinardy, B.T.I., Lukas, S., 2009. A comparison of the sedimentary signature of ice-contact sedimentation and deformation at macro- and micro-scale: a case study from NW Scotland. Sedimentary Geology, 221, 87-98.
  • 15. Smith, M.J., Rose, J., Lukas, S., 2008. Editorial: Quaternary of the British Isles and Adjoining Seas. Journal of Maps 2008, 290-298.
  • 14. Lukas, S., 2007. Early-Holocene glacier fluctuations in Krundalen, south central Norway: palaeo-glacier dynamics and palaeoclimate. The Holocene, 17, 585-598.
  • 13. Lukas, S., 2007. Englacial thrusting and (hummocky) moraine formation: a reply to comments by Graham et al. (2007). Boreas, 36, 108-113.
  • 12. Lukas, S., Spencer, J.Q.G., Robinson, R.A.J., Benn, D.I., 2007. Problems associated with luminescence dating of Late Quaternary glacial sediments in the NW Scottish Highlands. Quaternary Geochronology, 2, 243-248.
  • 11. Lukas, S., Nicholson, L.I., Humlum, O., 2007. Comment on Lønne and Lyså 2005: “Deglaciation dynamics following the Little Ice Age on Svalbard: Implications for shaping of landscapes at high latitudes, Geomorphology 72, 300-319”. Geomorphology, 84, 145-149.
  • 10. Volland, S., Sturm, M., Lukas, S., Pino, M., Müller, J., 2007. Geomorphological and sedimentological evolution of a lake basin under strong volcano-tectonic influence: The seismic record of Lago Calafquén (south-central Chile). Quaternary International, 161, 32-45.
  • 9. Lukas, S., 2006. Morphostratigraphic principles in glacier reconstruction - a perspective from the British Younger Dryas. Progress in Physical Geography, 30, 719-736.
  • 8. Lukas, S., 2006. Moraine or till? Suggestions for the description, interpretation and nomenclature of glacigenic sediments (in German with English summary). Zeitschrift für Gletscherkunde und Glazialgeologie, 39, 141-159.
  • 7. Lukas, S., Benn, D.I., 2006. Retreat dynamics of Younger Dryas glaciers in the far NW Scottish Highlands reconstructed from moraine sequences. Scottish Geographical Journal, 122, 308-325.
  • 6. Lukas, S., Lukas, T., 2006. A glacial geological and geomorphological map of the far NW Highlands, Scotland. Part 1. Journal of Maps 2006 (1), 43-55.
  • 5. Lukas, S., Lukas, T., 2006. A glacial geological and geomorphological map of the far NW Highlands, Scotland. Part 2. Journal of Maps 2006 (1), 56-58.
  • 4. Benn, D.I., Lukas, S., 2006. Younger Dryas glacial landsystems in North West Scotland: An assessment of modern analogues and palaeoclimatic implications. Quaternary Science Reviews, 25, 2390-2408.
  • 3. Lukas, S., 2005. A test of the englacial thrusting hypothesis of 'hummocky' moraine formation - case studies from the north-west Highlands, Scotland. Boreas, 34, 287-307.
  • 2. Lukas, S., Nicholson, L.I., Ross, F.H., Humlum, O., 2005. Formation, meltout processes and landscape alteration of high-arctic ice-cored moraines - examples from Nordenskiöld Land, central Spitsbergen. Polar Geography, 29, 157-187.
  • 1. Lukas, S., 2003. Scottish Landform Example No. 31. The moraines around the Pass of Drumochter. Scottish Geographical Journal, 119, 383-393.

Edited journal volumes (guest editor)

  • 1. Smith, M.J., Rose, J., Lukas, S., (eds.) 2008. The Quaternary of the British Isles and Adjoining Seas. Journal of Maps 2008, 290-416.

Edited books

  • 3. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W., 2013 (eds.). The Quaternary of the Monadhliath Mountains and the Great Glen: Field Guide. Quaternary Research Association, London, 230 pp.
  • 2. Lukas, S., Bradwell, T., 2010 (eds.). The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas: Field Guide. Quaternary Research Association, London, 246 pp.
  • 1. Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W., Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), 2004. The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 227 pp.

Book chapters

  • 26. Demir, T., Lukas, S., Warburton, J., Bridgland, D.R., 2016. Gravel clast shape: A user's guide to classification, analysis and application, In: Bridgland, D.R. (Ed.), Clast lithological analysis. Technical Guide. Quaternary Research Association, London, in press.
  • 25. Lukas, S., Preusser, F., Evans, D.J.A., Boston, C.M., Lovell, H. 2016. Quaternary framework. In: Martin, C.J., Griffiths, J. (eds). Engineering Geology of glacial and periglacial sediments. Geological Society of London, London, in press.
  • 24. Lukas, S., Coray, S., Graf, A., Schlüchter, C., 2016. The influence of clast lithology and fluvial reworking on the reliability of clast shape measurements in glacial environments – a case study from a temperate Alpine glacier, In: Bridgland, D.R. (Ed.), Clast lithological analysis. Technical Guide. Quaternary Research Association, London, in press.
  • 23. Lukas, S., 2016. Fine-gravel analysis in terrestrial Quaternary sedimentology, In: Bridgland, D.R. (Ed.), Clast lithological analysis. Technical Guide. Quaternary Research Association, London, in press.
  • 22. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., 2013. Evidence for ice advance during ice sheet deglaciation and ice-dammed lake formation, In: Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. (Eds.), The Quaternary of the Monadhliath Mountains and the Great Glen. Quaternary Research Association, London, 93-111.
  • 21. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., 2013. The sedimentology of Younger Dryas moraines in the vicinity of Loch Killin, In: Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. (Eds.), The Quaternary of the Monadhliath Mountains and the Great Glen. Quaternary Research Association, London, 121-127.
  • 20. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Carr, S.J., 2013. Overview of Younger Dryas glaciation in the Monadhliath Mountains, In: Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. (Eds.), The Quaternary of the Monadhliath Mountains and the Great Glen. Quaternary Research Association, London, 41-58.
  • 19. Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W., 2013. Introduction, In: Boston, C.M., Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. (Eds.), The Quaternary of the Monadhliath Mountains and the Great Glen. Quaternary Research Association, London, 1-2.
  • 18. Lukas, S., 2011. Younger Dryas, In: Singh, V., Singh, P., Haritashya, U.K. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Snow, Ice and Glaciers. Springer, Heidelberg, 1229-1232.
  • 17. Lukas, S., 2011. Ice-cored moraines, In: Singh, V., Singh, P., Haritashya, U.K. (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Snow, Ice and Glaciers. Springer, Heidelberg, 616-619.
  • 16. Jarman, D., Lukas, S., 2010. An Gorm-Choire RSF, Ben Hee, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 221-224.
  • 15. Lukas, S., 2010. Glaciation during the Younger Dryas in NW Scotland – a review, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 53-64.
  • 14. Lukas, S., 2010. Evidence of an ice-marginal oscillation during ice-sheet deglaciation: The Shinness Moraine, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 181-185.
  • 13. Lukas, S., 2010. Road side stops of glacial landform assemblages produced by the West Sutherland icefield during the Younger Dryas, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 187-189.
  • 12. Lukas, S., 2010. Sedimentology of 'hummocky' moraines in Eas na Maoile: Terrestrial ice-contact fans formed in succession, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 197-203.
  • 11. Lukas, S., Benn, D.I., Bradwell, T., Reinardy, B.T.I., 2010. Establishing a chronology of glaciation: The Loch Stack coring site, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 205-210.
  • 10. Lukas, S., Bradwell, T., 2010. Introduction, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 1-2.
  • 9. Reinardy, B.T.I., Lukas, S., 2010. Sedimentology of a terrestrial ice-contact fan in the Bealach nam Meirleach, In: Lukas, S., Bradwell, T. (Eds.), The Quaternary of Western Sutherland and adjacent areas. Quaternary Research Association, London, 191-195.
  • 8. Jarman, D., Lukas, S., 2007. Ben Hee. In: Cooper, R. (ed.), Mass Movements in Great Britain, Geological Conservation Review Series 33. Peterborough: Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 99-107
  • 7. Lukas, S., 2004. The pattern of deglaciation around the Pass of Drumochter. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 68-77.
  • 6. Lukas, S., 2004. Evidence for interlobate deposition during ice retreat in northern Glen Truim. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 159-162.
  • 5. Lukas, S., 2004. Landforms around Dalnaspidal Lodge. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 174-179.
  • 4. Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W., 2004. Evidence for a former ice-dammed lake in Coire Mhic-sith. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 149-158.
  • 3. Mitchell, W.A., Lukas, S., 2004. Drumochter Mast. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 163-170.
  • 2. Merritt, J.W., Lukas, S., Mitchell, W.A., 2004. The age of the landforms in the Central Grampian Highlands - a synthesis. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 85-91.
  • 1. Merritt, J.W., Mitchell, W.A., Lukas, S., 2004. Introduction. In: Lukas, S., Merritt, J.W. and Mitchell, W.A. (eds.), The Quaternary of the Central Grampian Highlands: Field Guide. London: Quaternary Research Association, 1-17.

Conference proceedings

  • 2. Irvine-Fynn, T.D.L., Porter, P.R., Barrand, N.E., Benn, D.I., Temminghoff, M. and Lukas. S. (2010). High-Arctic glacial-periglacial interactions and the development of terrain morphology on Brøggerhalvøya, Svalbard. Proceedings of Geo2010: 63rd Canadian Geotechnical and 6th Canadian Permafrost Conference, Calgary, AB, Canada.
  • 1. Lukas, S. (2008). Mechanisms of moraine formation under different glaciological boundary conditions – implications for interpreting the dynamics of Quaternary ice masses. Abhandlungen der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, 62, 193-195.

Non peer-reviewed journal articles and popular science contributions

  • 4. Lukas, S., 2014. Moraines – piles of dirt record glacier fluctuations. Invited online article on Climatica.org.uk, a website featuring articles about climate change written by scientists for the general public. (http://climatica.org.uk/moraines-piles-dirt-record-glacier-fluctuations)
  • 3. Lukas, S. 2010. Book review of Bennett and Glasser: Glacial Geology: Ice sheets and landforms, 2nd edition. Geological Magazine, 147, 989-990.
  • 2. Lukas, S., 2002. Reconstruction of lateglacial ice retreat based on the configuration of recessional moraines, Drumochter Pass, Central Grampian Highlands, Scotland (in German). Terra Nostra, 2002/6, 204-209.
  • 1. Lukas, S., Pflitsch, A., 2001. Reconstructing Late Pleistocene and Holocene permafrost history- a research project based on periglacial geomorphology. Windswept- The Quarterly Bulletin of the Mount Washington Observatory, 42, 19-21.

PhD Supervision

Postgraduate research opportunities in Earth Surface Science

Postgraduate student supervision

Successfully completed

  • Dr Harold Lovell (PhD; 2010-2014): Ice-sediment-landform assemblages of surging glaciers in Svalbard (principal supervisor), School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by NERC.
  • Dr Clare M. Boston (PhD; 2009–2012): Patterns and timing of lateglacial glaciation in the Monadhliath Mountains, central Scotland (principal supervisor), School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by NERC.
  • Dr Marcus Hatch (PhD; 2009-2014): Palaeolithic Archaeology of the Solent River: Human occupation in its stratigraphic context (third supervisor), School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by an AHRC studentship.
  • Dr Inga Schindelwig (PhD; 2006–2010): Dating and palaeoclimatic significance of Younger Dryas glaciation in the northern Swiss Alps (second supervisor), Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern. Funded by a Swiss National Science Foundation studentship.
  • William Hughes (MSc; 2010-2011): Reconstruction of Younger Dryas glaciers in the Lochnagar area, Scottish Highlands (first supervisor), School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Self-funded.
  • Dr Danielle Pearce (MPhil, part-time; 2007-2010): Palaeoclimatic significance of Younger Dryas glaciation of the Lake District, Northern England (second supervisor), Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London.
  • Michael Signer (MSc; 2007-2008, upper second class): Sedimentology and significance of subglacial bedforms recently exposed at the margin of Vadret da Grialetsch, Engadine, Switzerland (second supervisor), Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.
  • Sandro Coray (MSc; 2006-2007, first class): Genesis and significance of flutes at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland (principal supervisor), Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.
  • Andreas Graf (MSc; 2006-2007, first class): Sedimentology of a lateral moraine complex at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland (principal supervisor), Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.

Currently supervised

  • Harry McMahon (MSc, 2015-2016): Mechanisms of high-Alpine lateral moraines and implications for glacier dynamics and landscape formation, Eastern Alps. School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Self-funded.
  • Joshua Leigh (MSc, 2015-2016): A detailed assessment of lichenometry as a dating method for moraine sequences in the Eastern Alps of Europe. School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Self-funded.
  • Benjamin M.P. Chandler (PhD; 2014-2017): Patterns and timing of glaciation on the Gaick Plateau, Central Grampian Highlands, Scotland (principal supervisor). School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by NERC-equivalent College studentship.
  • Cianna E. Wyshnytzky (PhD; 2013-2016): The climatic and glaciological significance of annual moraine sequences in the European Alps. (principal supervisor), School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by a Principal’s Studentship.
  • Astrid Ruiter (PhD; 2012-2016): The 3D architecture and structure of a tectonised glacigenic sedimentary sequence in the Dogger Bank area of the southern North Sea (second supervisor). School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London. Funded by a joint studentship between QMUL and the British Geological Survey, Edinburgh.

Potential applicants are welcome to discuss their project ideas with me via email. Please also note the advertised topics on the School of Geography website (http://www.geog.qmul.ac.uk/admissions/phdadmissions/index.html).

If you are interested in the MSc in Environmental Science by Research, you will need to identify a potential supervisor (any member of staff in Physical Geography or Environmental Science) and agree a topic directly with them before contacting me with programme-specific questions.

Public engagement

Contributions to popular science

Articles

  • Lukas, S. and Pflitsch, A. (2001). Reconstructing Late Pleistocene and Holocene permafrost history – a research project based on periglacial geomorphology. Windswept – The Quarterly Bulletin of the Mount Washington Observatory 42: 19-21.

 

Invited talks - outreach

  • Lukas, S. (2013). Moraines and mud. What glaciers and glacial sediments can tell us about climate change. Invited lecture to the school’s Geography Society, Bancrofts School, Woodford Green, London, England on 25.02.2013.
  • Lukas, S. (2012). The fascinating world of mountain glaciers – arctic and alpine examples. Invited lecture to the school’s Geography Society, St Paul’s School, London, England on 03.09.2012.
  • Lukas, S. (2011). Moraines – what they are and what they can tell us about glaciers. Invited lecture given during the opening ceremony of the Jukladfjord Glacier Centre, Jondal, Norway on 18.06.2011.

 

Maps

  • British Geological Survey (in press). Ben Hee. Onshore Superficial deposits Map Sheet 108W, 1: 50 000. Edinburgh: British Geological Survey.
  • British Geological Survey (in press). Dalwhinnie. Onshore Superficial deposits Map Sheet 063E, 1: 50 000. Edinburgh: British Geological Survey.

 

Theses

  • Lukas, S. (2005). Younger Dryas moraines in the NW Highlands of Scotland: genesis, significance and potential modern analogues. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of St Andrews, Scotland, 211 pp.
  • Lukas, S. (2002). Geomorphological evidence for the pattern of deglaciation around the Drumochter Pass, Central Grampian Highlands, Scotland. Unpublished MSc thesis (Diplomarbeit). Ruhr-University of Bochum, Germany, 115 pp.
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