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Professor David Horne

Professor of Micropalaeontology

email: d.j.horne@qmul.ac.uk
Tel: 020 7882 7619

Profile

David  Horne

I specialise in the study living and fossil ostracod crustaceans, both marine and freshwater, and their applications in palaeoclimatology, palaeoceanography, biogeography, crustacean phylogeny and the evolution of sex and parthenogenesis. My recent research, as an associate member of the AHOB3 project (Ancient Human Occupation of Britain), has focused on developing my Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method and applying it to the quantitative palaeoclimatic reconstruction of Quaternary archaeological sites. I also work on pre-Quaternary ostracods, including Cretaceous marine and nonmarine faunas. I collaborate in multidisciplinary research with scientists in the UK as well as mainland Europe, Japan, Canada and the USA.

Key publications

  • Horne, D.J., Curry, B.B. & Mesquita-Joanes, F. 2012. Mutual climatic range methods for Quaternary ostracods. In: Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg, F. (eds) Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Science 17, 65-84. Elsevier.
  • Horne, D. J., Brandão, S. N. & Slipper, I. J. 2011. The Platycopid Signal deciphered: responses of ostracod taxa to environmental change during the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event (Late Cretaceous) in SE England. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 308, 304-312.
  • Holmes, J. A., Atkinson, T., Darbyshire, D. P. F., Horne, D. J., Joordens, J., Roberts, M. B., Sinka, K. J. & Whittaker, J. E.  2010. Middle Pleistocene climate and hydrological environment at the Boxgrove hominin site (West Sussex, UK) from ostracod records. Quaternary Science Reviews, 29, 1515–1527.
  • Horne, D. J. & Mezquita, F. 2008. Palaeoclimatic applications of large databases: developing and testing methods of palaeotemperature reconstruction using nonmarine ostracods. Senckenbergiana lethaea, 88, 93–112.

Teaching

Since joining QMUL in 2003 I have taught a wide range of undergraduate topics including environmental hazards, palaeoecology and Geographical Information Systems. I like to integrate lectures with workshops, seminars and practical work in the classroom or laboratory and in the field, and I am active in developing and using e-learning resources.

I am currently involved in the delivery of the following modules:

Level 4:

Level 5 :

Level 6:

Aspects of my research are incorporated into my teaching. For example, over the past five years, lectures and practical exercises based on my Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method have featured in the second year Global Environmental Change and Digital Worlds modules. Consequently, several students became sufficiently interested and enthused to undertake successful major projects aimed at developing, testing and applying aspects of the method, leading in turn to postgraduate work on the same topic in two cases and in a third case to co-authorship of a research publication. Thus both research and teaching have benefited from the integration of an innovative palaeoclimate application with undergraduate coursework. Research links have also enabled me to arrange for guest speakers on undergraduate modules, as well as specialist-hosted group visits to the Natural History Museum.

I have worked with Thinking Writing staff at QMUL on several projects including CLEAR (Critical Literature Evaluation & Review), a QMUL team contribution (chaired by Morag Shiach) to the Higher Education Academy’s programme Developing and Embedding Inclusive Policies and Practices, a QMUL Working Group on Developing Students' Writing, and DALiC (Developing Academic Literacy in Context). Writing workshops linked to group-based coursework assignments, jointly run with Thinking Writing staff, are a key feature of the Environmental Hazards module. In 2013 I received the QMUL Students' Union Assessment & Feedback award.

Research

Research interests:


Quaternary and Recent ostracods and their applications

Ostracods are common microfossils in Quaternary (Pleistocene and Holocene) deposits. Their ecological diversity makes them useful as palaeoenvironmental proxies in oceanic, coastal and continental settings; they are also particularly valuable for reconstructing past climatic conditions (e.g. with the MOTR method) and can be helpful for correlating and establishing the relative ages of the deposits in which they are found. My research involves all of these applications, often as a member of a multidisciplinary team, as well as studies of Recent (living) ostracod taxonomy, ecology and distribution which are essential to understand better their significance as fossil proxies.

 


Ostracoda as proxies for Quaternary climate change

The value of ostracods value as Quaternary palaeoclimate proxies, through indicator species, transfer function, mutual climatic range and geochemical approaches, is the focus of a major book project to which 39 international authors contributed, of which I was the lead editor and which was published at the end of 2012.

Science Direct

 

 


The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method
I use ostracods as palaeoclimate proxies in various ways. My Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method combines nonmarine ostracod distributional data (e.g. from the NODE database) with modern climate data to establish species’ mean air temperature ranges (e.g. for January and July); thus calibrated, overlapping ranges of fossil ostracods in Quaternary assemblages are used to determine the mutual temperature range within which they could have lived. This has facilitated quantitative palaeoclimate reconstructions for British Pleistocene archaeological sites including Boxgrove and Purfleet and is currently being used in multiproxy studies of Quaternary sites in Italy, Germany, Estonia and Canada.

Conference poster pdf download: DJHorne MOTR poster.pdf [12.4 mb]

 


The NODE (Nonmarine Ostracod Distribution in Europe) database
The primary "training set" source for the MOTR method is the NODE database, initiated by members of an EU-funded project (Evolutionary Ecology of Reproductive Modes in Non-marine Ostracoda: 1994–1996) and further developed in support of two other EU-funded projects (Fauna Europaea: 2000–2004; From Sex to Asex: a case study on interactions between sexual and asexual reproduction: 2004–2008). It currently contains approximately 10,000 records of living species and 2,000 fossil (Quaternary) records; as database steward I welcome approaches from anyone interested in contributing to or using it. NODE is linked to other regional databases via the OMEGA project.

Fauna Europaea

 


OMEGA: The Ostracod Metadatabase of Environmental and Geographical Attributes
OMEGA will be a global dataset, with applications in palaeoclimate, biodiversity and biogeography research, combining regional datasets and harmonising their taxonomy.  OMEGA will be realised through international collaboration and sharing of regional ostracod databases such as NODE, NANODe in the USA and the Delorme database at the Canadian Museum of Nature.  The development of OMEGA is supported by the EU-funded BioFresh project. Datasets will be made available through the BioFresh portal and through Neotoma. An associated Citizen Science project assists with checking, correcting and validating the geographical coordinates of sites where ostracod species have been recorded.

Conference poster pdf download:

Horne and Martens southern African ostracods poster.pdf [8.4 mb]

 


Ostracods as palaeoceanographic proxiesThe widely accepted  “Platycopid Signal” Hypothesis claims that fossil ostracod assemblages dominated by the Order Platycopida signal dysaerobic conditions on the sea floor, based on the premise that filter-feeding platycopids, able to pass more water over their respiratory surface, were better-equipped than other ostracods to survive in poorly oxygenated waters. I and co-authors have challenged claims of modern biological and ecological support for the Platycopid Signal and have advanced an alternative interpretation, suggesting that platycopid dominance may signify oligotrophy rather than dysaerobia, because living platycopids appear adapted to filter-feed on nano- and picoplankton which are predominant in oligotrophic conditions.

 


Purbeck-Wealden ostracods: biostratigraphy and palaeoenvironmentsThe mid-Mesozoic was a time of explosive global diversification of nonmarine ostracod faunas, establishing lineages that persist to this day. My research on ostracod assemblages of Jurassic–Cretaceous continental deposits (the "Purbeck-Wealden" in Britain) includes revisions of their taxonomy, biostratigraphical zonation schemes and palaeoenvironmental interpretations that have implications for Mesozoic nonmarine basins worldwide. The application of a palaeobiological approach to the interpretation of Purbeck-Wealden ostracod assemblages has been particularly rewarding; for example, a combination of pollen and ostracod fossils provided evidence for temporary freshwater pond conditions associated with a dinosaur skeleton in a Cretaceous Weald Clay pit in Surrey.

 


Ostracod evolution and phylogeny
Ostracod shells provide the best fossil record of any arthropods, extending back 500 million years, but the rarity of preservation of their appendages and other "soft parts" impedes efforts to understand their phylogenetic relationships. Ostracods are well-known for providing examples of geographical parthenogenesis and unusual longevity of asexual reproduction.  As a micropalaeontologist I collaborate with zoologists, ecologists and molecular biologists in studying ostracods and crustacean phylogeny as well as the evolutionary ecology of sex and parthenogenesis, e.g. as a participant in the EU-funded project: From Sex to Asex: a case study on interactions between sexual and asexual reproduction (2004–2008).

 


Some living ostracods. A–C: marine-brackish cytheroidean podocopids; D: freshwater cypridoidean podocopids. Scale bars approx. 1 mm.

An introduction to ostracods

Ostracods are small crustacean arthropods characterized by a bivalved carapace that can totally enclose the body and appendages. They have an excellent fossil record by virtue of their small size and mineralized (calcite) shells or valves. Their bodies have reduced trunk segmentation and up to eight pairs of specialised limbs that are extended between the gaping valves for locomotion, feeding, and reproductive activity. Adult ostracods are typically 0.5–2.0mm long; some interstitial forms, however, are as small as 0.2 mm, some freshwater species grow up to 8.0mm, and a pelagic marine myodocopan reaches 32mm. They are one of the most diverse crustacean groups, with an estimated 20,000 living species, of which fewer than half have been formally described. They have a 500 million-year fossil record, from the Ordovician onwards, with more than 65,000 fossil species described. They are all essentially aquatic, inhabiting both marine and nonmarine environments, although some taxa are adapted to a semi-terrestrial life. They have many applications in palaeoenvironmental analysis, palaeoclimatology and biostratigraphy.

 

Examples of genera of the major living groups of Ostracoda, all external lateral views.  A, Vargula (Myodocopida, Cypridinoidea), car. with appendages, left side; B, Polycope (Halocyprida, Cladocopoidea), LV;  C, Cytherelloidea (Platycopida, Cytherelloidea), RV; D–R, Podocopida: D, Saipanetta (Sigillioidea), car., right side; E, Neonesidea (Bairdioidea), car., right side; F, Propontocypris (Pontocypridoidea), car., left side; G, Macrocypris (Macrocypridoidea), LV; H, Cyprinotus (Cypridoidea), car., left side; I, Ilyocypris (Cypridoidea), RV; J, Candona (Cypridoidea), RV; K, Centrocypris (Cypridoidea), RV; L, Baffinicythere (Cytheroidea), RV; M, Hemicytherura (Cytheroidea), LV; N, Semicytherura (Cytheroidea), LV; O, Cyprideis (Cytheroidea), LV; P, Sahnicythere (Cytheroidea), car., right side; Q, Pterygocythereis (Cytheroidea), LV; R, Darwinula (Darwinuloidea), car., left side. Scale bar = 1.0 mm; arrows point anteriorly). RV = right valve; LV = left valve, car. = carapace.  A–G, L–M and P–Q are marine, N–O are brackish water; H–K and R are nonmarine (fresh water).
Original figure prepared for Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.  & Ruiz-Muñoz, F.  (2012). A general introduction to ostracods: morphology, distribution, fossil record and applications. In: Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg , F. (eds) Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Science 17, 1-14. Elsevier.


Main morphologic characteristics of the carapace and limbs of a marine nekto-benthonic myodocopan (Cypridinoidea) and a marine benthonic podocopan (Bairdioidea). Arrows point anteriorly.
Original figure prepared for Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.  & Ruiz-Muñoz, F.  (2012). A general introduction to ostracods: morphology, distribution, fossil record and applications. In: Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg , F. (eds) Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Science 17, 1-14. Elsevier.

 

 

 

 

 


Stratigraphical timelines of the major ecological radiations of the Ostracoda.
Original figure prepared for Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.  & Ruiz-Muñoz, F.  (2012). A general introduction to ostracods: morphology, distribution, fossil record and applications. In: Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg , F. (eds) Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Science 17, 1-14. Elsevier.

Links:

International Research Group on Ostracoda

The Micropalaeontological Society

Publications

I have published more than 130 journal articles, book chapters and edited books since completing my PhD in 1980.

Selected publications are listed below according to research projects listed above. A complete list is available as a pdf or online at PubLists

Quaternary and Recent ostracods and their applications

  • Peacock, J.D., Horne, D.J. & Whittaker, J.E. 2012. Late Devensian evolution of the marine offshore environment of western Scotland. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, 123, 419-437.
  • Horne, D. J., Jocque, M., Brendonck, L. & Martens, K. 2011. On Potamocypris compressa (Crustacea, Ostracoda) from temporary rock pools in Utah, USA, with notes on the taxonomic harmonisation of North American and European ostracod faunas. Zootaxa, 2793, 35-46.
  • Keatings, K., Holmes, J., Flower, R., Horne, D., Whittaker, J. E. & Abu-Zied, R. H. 2010. Ostracods and the Holocene palaeolimnology of Lake Qarun, with special reference to past human–environment interactions in the Faiyum (Egypt). Hydrobiologia, 654, 155-176.
  • Whittaker, J. E. & Horne, D. J. 2009. Pleistocene. In: Whittaker, J. E. & Hart, M. B. (eds), Ostracods in British Stratigraphy. The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications, 447–467.
  • Martens, K., Schön, I., Meisch, C. & Horne, D. J. 2008. Global diversity of ostracods (Ostracoda, Crustacea) in freshwater. Hydrobiologia, 595, 185-193.
  • Horne, D. J., Smith, R. J., Whittaker, J. E. & Murray, J. W. 2004. The first British record and a new species of the superfamily Terrestricytheroidea (Crustacea, Ostracoda): morphology, ontogeny, lifestyle and phylogeny. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society,142, 253-288.
  • Boomer, I., Horne, D. J. & Slipper, I. J. 2003. The use of ostracods in palaeoenvironmental studies, or what can you do with an ostracod shell? In Park, L. E. & Smith, A. J. (eds), Bridging the gap: trends in the ostracode biological and geological sciences. The Paleontological Society Papers, 9, 153-179.
  • Horne, D. J., Cohen, A. & Martens, K. 2002. Taxonomy, morphology and biology of Quaternary and living Ostracoda, In Holmes, J. A. & Chivas, A. R. (eds), The Ostracoda: Applications in Quaternary research, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series, Vol. 131, 5-36.
  • Smith, A. J. & Horne, D. J.  2002. Ecology of marine, marginal marine and nonmarine ostracodes. In Holmes, J. A. & Chivas, A. R. (eds), The Ostracoda: Applications in Quaternary research, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series, Vol. 131, 37-64.

Ostracods as palaeoclimate proxies

  • Bridgland, D., Harding, P., Allen, P., Candy, I., Cherry, C., George, W., Horne, D. J., Keene, D.H., Penkman, K. E. H., Preece, R.C., Rhodes, E., Scaife, R., Schreve, D.C., Schwenninger, J.L., Slipper, I., Ward, G., White, M.J., White, T.S. & Whittaker, J.E.  2013.  An enhanced record of MIS 9 environments, geochronology and geoarchaeology: data from construction of the High Speed 1 (London–Channel Tunnel) rail-link and other recent investigations at Purfleet, Essex, UK. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association, 124, 417-476.
  • Horne, D.J., Curry, B.B. & Mesquita-Joanes, F. 2012b. Mutual climatic range methods for Quaternary ostracods. In: Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg , F. (eds) Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Science 17, 65-84. Elsevier.
  • Horne, D.J., Holmes, J.A., Rodriguez-Lazaro, J. & Viehberg , F. (eds) 2012a. Ostracoda as Proxies for Quaternary Climate Change. Developments in Quaternary Sciences 17, 373 pp. Elsevier.
  • Holmes, J. A., Atkinson, T., Darbyshire, D. P. F., Horne, D. J., Joordens, J., Roberts, M. B., Sinka, K. J. & Whittaker, J. E.  2010. Middle Pleistocene climate and hydrological environment at the Boxgrove hominin site (West Sussex, UK) from ostracod records. Quaternary Science Reviews, 29, 1515-1527.
  • Williams, M., Siveter, D.J., Ashworth, A.C., Wilby, P.R., Horne, D.J., Lewis, A.R. & Marchant, D.R. 2008. Exceptionally preserved lacustrine ostracods from the Middle Miocene of Antarctica: implications for high-latitude palaeoenvironment at 77o South. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Series B (Biological Sciences) 275, 2449–2454.
  • Horne, D. J. & Mezquita, F. 2008. Palaeoclimatic applications of large databases: developing and testing methods of palaeotemperature reconstruction using nonmarine ostracods. Senckenbergiana lethaea, 88, 93-112.
  • Horne, D. J.  2007. A Mutual Temperature Range method for Quaternary palaeoclimatic analysis using European nonmarine Ostracoda. Quaternary Science Reviews, 26, 1398-1415.
  • Brouwers, E. M. , Cronin, T. M., Horne, D. J. & Lord, A. R.  2000. Recent shallow  marine ostracods from high latitudes: implications for late Pliocene and Quaternary palaeoclimatology. Boreas, 29, 127-143.

 

Ostracods as palaeoceanographic proxies

  • Horne, D. J., Brandão, S. N. & Slipper, I. J. 2011. The Platycopid Signal deciphered: responses of ostracod taxa to environmental change during the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event (Late Cretaceous) in SE England. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 308, 304-312.
  • Brandão, S. N. & Horne, D. J. 2009. The Platycopid Signal of oxygen depletion in the ocean: a critical evaluation of the evidence from modern ostracod biology, ecology and depth distribution. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 283, 126–133.
  • Okada, R., Tsukagoshi, A., Smith, R. & Horne, D. J. 2008. The ontogeny of the platycopid Keijcyoidea infralittoralis (Ostracoda: Podocopa). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 153, 213-237.
  • Tsukagoshi, A., Okada, R. & Horne, D. J. 2006. Appendage homologies and the first record of eyes in platycopid ostracods, with the description of a new species of Keijcyoidea (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from Japan. Hydrobiologia, 559, 255-274.

 

Purbeck-Wealden ostracods: biostratigraphy and palaeoenvironments

  • Sames, B. & Horne, D.J. 2012. Latest Jurassic to Cretaceous non-marine ostracod biostratigraphy: Unde venis, quo vadis? Journal of Stratigraphy, 36, 266-288.
  • Horne, D.J. 2011. Ostracods. In Batten, D.J. (ed.), English Wealden Fossils, 125–137. The Palaeontological Association, London, Field Guides to fossils 14, ix + 769 pp.
  • Horne, D. J. 2009. Purbeck – Wealden. In: Whittaker, J. E. & Hart, M. B. (eds), Ostracods in British Stratigraphy.  The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications, 289–308.
  • Nye, E., Feist-Burkhardt, S., Horne, D. J., Ross, A. J. & Whittaker, J. E. 2008. The palaeoenvironment associated with a partial Iguanodon skeleton from the Upper Weald Clay (Barremian, Early Cretaceous) at Smokejacks Brickworks (Ockley, Surrey, UK), based on palynomorphs and ostracods. Cretaceous Research, 29, 417-444.
  • Horne, D. J.  2002. Ostracod biostratigraphy and palaeoecology of the Purbeck Limestone Group in southern England. Special Papers in Palaeontology, 68, 1-18, 2 pls.

 

Ostracod evolution and phylogeny

  • Schmit, O., Bode, S.N.S., Camacho, A., Horne, D.J., Lamatsch, D.K., Martens, K., Martins, M.J., Namiotko, T., Rossetti, G., Rueda-Sevilla, J., Schön, I., Vandekerkhove, J. & Mesquita-Joanes, F. (accepted in press). Linking present environment and the segregation of reproductive modes (Geographic Parthenogenesis) in Eucypris virens (Crustacea: Ostracoda).  Journal of Biogeography...
  • Olempska, E., Horne, D.J. & Szaniawaski, H. 2011. First record of preserved soft parts in a Palaeozoic podocopid (Metacopina) ostracod, Cytherellina submagna: phylogenetic implications. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, series B (Biological Sciences)
  • Boxshall, G.A., Danielopol, D.L., Horne, D.J., Smith, R.J & Tabacaru, I. 2010. A critique of biramous interpretations of the crustacean antennule. Crustaceana, 83, 153–167.
  • Horne, D. J.  2010. Talking about a re-evolution: blind alleys in ostracod phylogeny. Journal of Micropalaeontology, 29, 1–6.
  • Smith, R. J., Kamiya, T. & Horne, D. J. 2006. Living males of the 'ancient asexual' Darwinulidae (Ostracoda: Crustacea). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, series B (Biological Sciences), 273, 1569-1578.
  • Williams, M., Leng, M.J., Stephenson, M.H., Andrews, J.E.,Wilkinson, I.P., Siveter, D.J., Horne, D.J., & Vannier, J.M.C. 2006. Evidence that Early Carboniferous ostracods colonised coastal floodplain brackish water environments. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 230, 299-318.
  • Horne, D. J., Schön, I., Smith, R.J & Martens, K.  2005. What are Ostracoda? A cladistic analysis of the extant superfamilies of the subclasses Myodocopa and Podocopa (Ostracoda: Crustacea). In Koenemann, S. & Jenner, R.A. (eds). Crustacea and arthropod relationships. Crustacean Issues 16,  249-273.
  • Horne, D. J. 2005. Homology and homoeomorphy in ostracod limbs. Hydrobiologia, 538, 55-80.
  • Martens, K., Rossetti, G. & Horne, D. J.  2003. How ancient are ancient asexuals? Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, series B (Biological Sciences), 270, 723-729.
  • Horne, D. J.  2003. Key events in the ecological radiation of the Ostracoda. In Park, L. E. & Smith, A. J. (eds), Bridging the gap: trends in the ostracode biological and geological sciences. The Paleontological Society Papers, 9, 181-201.

An introduction to ostracods

  • Martens, K. & Horne, D. J. 2009. Ostracoda. In: Likens, G. E. (ed.), Encyclopedia of Inland Waters, 405-414. Elsevier Ltd.
  • Horne, D. J.  2005. Ostracoda. In  Selley, R. C., Cocks, R. M.  & Plimer, I.R. (eds) Encyclopaedia of Geology, vol. 3, 453-463. Elsevier, Oxford. ISBN: 0-12-636380-3

PhD Supervision

I previously supervised PhD students at the University of Greenwich, including:

  • Alasdair Bruce (PhD, 2002). Holocene microfaunas and the evolution of the Fleet (Dorset).
  • Emma Page (PhD, 2002).Evaluation of the effectiveness of an Environmental Management System in the construction industry.
  • Ian Slipper (PhD, 1997). Turonian (Late Cretaceous) Ostracoda from Dover, South-East England.
  • Nicky Johnson (PhD 1997). Ostracod Palaeobiogeography during the Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Europe.
  • Roland Wood (PhD, 1992). Ostracoda of the English Lake District.

I am currently supervising three PhD students at QMUL:

  • Ginny Benardout Quantifying Quaternary climate change: testing micropalaeontological proxy methods for palaeotemperature estimation.  Co-supervised by Simon Lewis (QMUL) and Steve Brooks (The Natural History Museum). Started 2010.
  • Michaela Radl Palaeoecological applications of saltmarsh meiofauna to understanding saltmarsh development and management. Co-supervised by Rob Hughes (QMUL, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences). Started 2011.
  • Anna March Climate variability during MIS11 in Britain. Co-supervised by Simon Lewis (QMUL) and Jonathan Holmes (UCL). Started 2013.

Public engagement


My outreach activities include talks in schools and for local societies, contributions to school taster days at QMUL and a schools masterclass (on tsunami hazards) at the Royal Geographical Society. I am seeking to engage members of the public in a project in connection with my palaeoclimate research and the OMEGA project, within our Training and Research Initiative in Citizen Science.

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