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David M. Smith Annual Lecture

The 14th David M. Smith Annual Lecture, 'Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Revolt, Uprising, and Revolution Shaped a City' was given on Thursday 30 November 2017 by Don Mitchell, Professor of Cultural Geography in the Department of Social and Economic Geography at Uppsala University, Sweden.

 

 

Previous lectures include:

  • 2016 Tom Slater (University of Edinburgh) 'From territorial stigma to territorial justice: a critique of vested interest urbanism'. The lecture formed part of a wider event, a reunion for former students and staff in geography, geology and environmental science at QMUL. View photos of the event on Flickr and view the recording of the lecture on YouTube
  • 2015 Jennifer Robinson (University College London) 'Post-Democracy Meets Post-Colony: London as a theory destination’
  • 2014 Chris Philo (University of Glasgow) ‘Well-Being, Mental Health and the Smiths
  • 2013 Susan Parnell (University of Cape Town) ‘Making Cities Fairer’ – click here for a video of the 2013 lecture.
  • 2012 Paul Cloke (University of Exeter) ‘Postsecular stirrings? Geographies of hope in amongst neoliberalism’
  • 2011 Jamie Peck (University of British Columbia, Canada) ‘Fast policy, at the limits of neoliberalism’
  • 2010 David Harvey (City University of New York) ‘The dialectics of social change’
  • 2009 Onora O’Neill (University of Cambridge) ‘Geographical problems, political solutions?’
  • 2008 Partha Chatterjee (Columbia University, New York) ‘Terrorism: a word that travelled’
  • 2007 Susan M Smith (University of Cambridge) ‘Who gets what, where in the tangled world of housing, mortgage and financial markets?’
  • 2006 John Pickles (University of North Carolina) ‘New cartographies of the borderlands: on the geographies of democracy-to-come’
  • 2005 Stuart Corbridge (London School of Economics and Political Science) ‘Development studies after 9/11: the (im)morality of critique’
  • 2004 Doreen Massey (Open University) ‘Space, time and political responsibility’
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