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Modules

TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Advanced Readings in GeographyGEG7101Semester 17No

Advanced Readings in Geography

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Unlike other option modules, Advanced Readings in Geography will be taught on an individual basis and only in exceptional circumstances. The student would be required to complete a proposal explaining why s/he would like to conduct advanced level readings on a clearly defined area of research that is not covered in detail on other MA/MSc courses. If an appropriate colleague agrees to supervise the Readings module, fortnightly meetings will be held to discuss the readings and to develop the 5000 word paper. The course is essentially self-directed, like equivalent courses taught elsewhere at Masters level.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Art, Performance and the CityGEG7102Semester 27Yes

Art, Performance and the City

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module centres on projects by artists and cultural practitioners in London and particularly its East End. It involves critical reading, background research, and engaging with practices and sites through documentation, excursions and discussions with artists. The module begins with sessions on cultural practices of urban exploring and walking. Sessions then introduce and discuss particular cases that form the basis for research and seminar discussion. These may include historical walking tours in East London; artistic walking projects by Francis Alys, Tim Brennan, Janet Cardiff and Iain Sinclair; cinematic representations by Patrick Keiller; controversies about place and politics involved in Rachel Whiteread's House, completed in 1993 at a site on Grove Road next to Queen Mary; and contemporary artistic engagements with the Olympics site. Through these materials, the module explores geographical and political issues concerned the art and the city, and aspects of the changing nature and practice of urban cultures in London and its East End.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Dissertation 15,000 WordsGEG7107Full year7No

Dissertation 15,000 Words

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Dissertation 30,000 WordsGEG7108Full year7No

Dissertation 30,000 Words

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Empire, Race and ImmigrationGEG7109Semester 27Yes

Empire, Race and Immigration

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Shompa Lahiri
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module will include a historically specific thick case study approach, as well as a broader chronological perspective, to examine how individuals and groups of colonial and racial migrants experienced, contested and negotiated Britain and the types of reactions they provoked over the last three hundred years. Not only does this provide postgraduate students with a unique opportunity to interrogate the historical orthodoxy of an ethnically homogeneous white nation prior to 1948; it also highlights the need for rethinking the relationship between Empire and metropolis.

The first half of the module familiarises students with a variety of theoretical approaches to the study of empire, race and migration. This is followed by an analysis of the multifarious strategies adopted by colonial sojourners and settlers in Britain and the popular and official reactions they inspired. Particular emphasis will be placed on how empire, race, class and gender informed both colonial experience and metropolitan attitudes. The remainder of the module considers the racialisation of immigration in the post-colonial period and concludes by examining the legacies of empire, race and immigration on the metropolis.

It is intended that students from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds including Geography, History, English, Politics) will utilise the knowledge and theoretical expertise gleaned from the module to produce a course paper, which could, if preferred, focus not just on the British experience, but on comparable locations and temporal periods.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Dissertation 22,500 WordsGEG7118Full year7No

Dissertation 22,500 Words

Credits: 90.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of original research on a subject that directly relates to your interests within geography. Following a period of consultation with your supervisor you will develop a topic that relates to your studies and then be given the skills to conduct detailed theoretical and empirical research on that topic. The research may include quantitative or qualitative approaches and include fieldwork and archival research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Geographical Thought and PracticeGEG7120Full year7Yes

Geographical Thought and Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides subject-specific research training in human geography and will cover core understanding of key concepts and approaches to human geography research; subject specific research and transferable skills; and qualitative and quantitative, subject specific methodological and presentation techniques. This module will equip students with the skills necessary to design and implement an extended piece of primary research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Cultural Geography in PracticeGEG7122Semester 17Yes

Cultural Geography in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on what could be described as creative and public cultural geographies. It explores the ways in which cultural geography is being undertaken and disseminated through forms of creative practice, participatory approaches and collaborative projects. These include collaborations between cultural geographers and creative practitioners and collaborative relationships with public cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries. Through class discussions and on site explorations of current examples, the module explores the contexts, approaches, practical strategies, possibilities and challenges of creative and public cultural geographies.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Cities, Space and PowerGEG7123Semester 17Yes

Cities, Space and Power

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Miles Ogborn
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the relationships between space and power in different cities in the past and the present. Focusing on debates about the emergence and contestation of urban public space, the module uses a range of materials ¿ poetry, novels, art, film, newspaper stories and fieldwork ¿ to explore how the city¿s geographies have been shaped and reshaped by relationships of power. The course uses London, past and present, as a key example, and develops comparative perspectives through other city examples, such as Los Angeles and colonial and post-colonial Calcutta/Kolkata.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Introduction to Social Science Research: Qualitative MethodsGEG7126Semester 17Yes

Introduction to Social Science Research: Qualitative Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an interdisciplinary introduction to qualitative traditions of social research. It aims to give you an understanding of some of the main forms of qualitative research, to offer you opportunities to develop the necessary skills for conducting qualitative research, and to help you in reading and assessing research publications. The module is also designed to offer you opportunities to discuss your own research, and to exchange ideas with students from a range of disciplines.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Introduction to Social Science Research: Quantitative MethodsGEG7127Semester 27No

Introduction to Social Science Research: Quantitative Methods

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides core training in quantitative research methods in the social sciences. You will develop the capacity to undertake independent guided research at postgraduate level and to use advanced quantitative skills appropriate for postgraduate research and many non-academic careers. Further, you will be able to analyse, interpret, critique and replicate published research using quantitative research methods and will acquire sufficient technical competence using SPSS to perform a range of quantitative techniques in your own research.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Monday 10 am - 1 pm

Researching Development in Practice: Mumbai UnboundGEG7128Semester 17No

Researching Development in Practice: Mumbai Unbound

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This innovative fieldwork-based module challenges the long-standing academic division of labour between 'economic' and 'development' geographers, and instead builds an alternative hybrid approach, operationalised through an empirical focus on urban change in Mumbai, one of India's Tier I cities. PGT students will be expected to devise their own projects and site visits in Mumbai in relation to these themes. Teaching is focused around a series of core themes: (i) Mumbai's dual economy, in which low-end, low-paid local service providers such as janitors, security guards, cleaners, and laundry underpin the success of high profile, multinational corporations in the financial services, hospitality and IT sectors; (ii) work and employment in India's high profile Business Process Outsourcing - IT-Enabled Services Industry; (iii) the growth of India¿s new middle classes, new patterns of consumption amongst these classes and their inscriptions in the urban fabric; and (iv) poverty and hope in Mumbai¿s slums, focusing around informal economies of survival amongst different social and ethnic groups in Dharavi; diverse informal economies related to leather, itinerant waste collectors and pottery and NGO projects to improve well-being and quality of life within Mumbai¿s slums.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 1 pm - 2 pm

Migration and MobilitiesGEG7129Semester 27No

Migration and Mobilities

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Cathy Mcilwaine
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores theoretical, empirical and policy dimensions of patterns and processes of migration and mobilities in a global context and consciously across the global North/global South 'divide' from a scalar, relational and networked perspective. Although the focus will be on the nature and dynamics of contemporary movement of people, the module will also incorporate an analysis of the movement of information, goods and capital as framed within the `new mobilities paradigm¿. Theoretically, the module analyses the key framings of contemporary migration in relation to transnationalism, diaspora and post-national citizenship. In turn, it will interrogate the nature and links between transnationalism, multiculturalism and/or integration; the migration-development nexus; the politics of irregularity and 'illegality'; the relationships between the emergence of global cities and a migrant division of labour; the nature of global gendered mobilities and power and mobility as well as the interrelations between conflict, violence and mobility.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Global working livesGEG7131Semester 17No

Global working lives

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alan James
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module explores the economic-development geographies of people's everyday struggles to make a living in the contemporary global economy. Drawing on research within and across the Global North and Global South, this module engages with an exciting 'labour geographies' research agenda, concerned with how workers are capable of fashioning the geography of capitalism to suit their own needs and self-production; and to identify geographical possibilities and labour market strategies through which `workers may challenge, outmaneuver and perhaps even beat capital¿ in different locations. The module seeks to expose the spatial limits of mainstream 'universal' theories in geography which presume that 'the economy' and 'labour' can be theorised solely from the perspective of the formal spaces of advanced capitalist economies in the global North.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Seminar
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Retheorizing development futuresGEG7132Semester 17No

Retheorizing development futures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will provide the theoretical framework underpinning all the modules for this programme. Teaching will be divided into 4 blocks each examining key substantive themes: (i) Hybrid worlds seminars will introduce students to key debates challenging the academic and disciplinary divides between economic and development geography. In particular these seminars will challenge the representation of the global South as a collection of people and places in need of development intervention and where geographic theory and knowledge travels to, and the economy as only operating in and through advanced economies. These seminars will encourage students to challenge these boundaries and recognise an increasingly interconnected global South and North. (ii) Gendered development futures seminars will focus on the gendered history of development highlighting the critical junctures at which the discipline has been engendered. It will introduce students to key gender and development theories and approaches and the changing nature and politics of gender scholarship. (iii) Citizenship, justice and democracy will focus on questions of contemporary citizenships and their position with regards to democracy and rights. Detailing feminist and postcolonial frameworks, it will highlight the uneven geographies and experiences of democracy, citizenship and rights. (iv) Transnational migration and mobilities will introduce students to contemporary theoretical approaches to migration and mobility focusing particularly on transnational theory. Unpacking the complex mobilities of people, commodities and money, these seminars will particularly focus on migrant remittances illustrating the increasingly contested nature of these flows in relation to the migration-development nexus and the 'financialisation of development'.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Independent Research ProjectGEG7202Full year7No

Independent Research Project

Credits: 120.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module allows the student to undertake a piece of independent, supervised research on a topic within the scope of physical geographical and environmental science research. The project may involve working with a partner organisation and it may therefore have an applied focus or contribute to the work of that organisation. The project will normally involve field and/or laboratory work, together with use of appropriate data analysis tools.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Project-Specific Research TrainingGEG7204Semester 17No

Project-Specific Research Training

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce the student to research issues, methodologies and field and laboratory procedures that are appropriate to the research topic top be investigated in the Independent Research Project, including theoretical background and context, research design and project management. The research area for the project will therefore significantly determine the module content. The module is delivered through formal supervisory sessions, together with appropriate field and/or laboratory training.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Data AnalysisGEG7205Semester 17Yes

Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof James Brasington
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of numerical, statistical land modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in specific approaches to data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 12 pm - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Environmental Science Research and PracticeGEG7206Semester 17Yes

Environmental Science Research and Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to current research issues and approaches in environmental science. Students will develop an understanding of the nature and scope of environmental science research, enabling them to engage with a wide range of research debates. They will conduct an in-depth review of research on a specific topic of interest, and evaluate the utility of different research approaches to investigating that topic. The module is delivered via lectures from guest speakers and seminars with physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Desk StudyGEG7305Semester 27No

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGEG7308Full year7No

Individual Research Project

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students are encouraged to undertake their Individual Research Project in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation The theme for the Individual Research Project is selected by the student in collaboration with the module organiser and in most cases with the practitioner organisation in order to ensure that the project and practitioner link matches the research interests and career aspirations of the student. Students not wishing to link with a practitioner organisation can opt to undertake a free-standing research project of their choice, subject to approval by the module organiser. In either case, the project is undertaken over a twelve week period, and each student is allocated an academic advisor from the MSc academic staff to ensure that they receive appropriate academic guidance during the research. The project report will be marked by two members of the MSc academic staff (usually including the student's advisor) and, where the project is in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation, comments on the project by the link person in that practitioner / user organisation will also be taken into account.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental ScienceGEG7309Semester 17No

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is based around a residential field course, which will introduce students to the investigation and assessment of freshwater environments. The field course will provide training in designing safe field programmes and will introduce the equipment and techniques employed in routine sampling and measurement of the physical and chemical properties of freshwater environments and their biota. Overall the module will provide a sound introduction to field methods for studying freshwater environments and their use in the assessment of freshwater environment quality.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGEG7310Semester 27Yes

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem ServicesGEG7313Semester 27Yes

Biogeosciences and Ecosystem Services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 11 am - 1 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Flood Risk Management and ModellingGEG7314Semester 27Yes

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is divided into two linked elements. The first explores the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are examined and novel management options for reducing flood risk (including strategic rural land management and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) are critically reviewed. Flood protection in London is explored through a field trip to the Thames Barrier and potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are reviewed. The second component of the module is focussed on flood risk modelling. A combination of lecture and practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
    Lab
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

River Assessment and RestorationGEG7317Semester 17Yes

River Assessment and Restoration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide the key knowledge and understanding at an advanced level necessary to support the development of management strategies for rivers along the catchment to coast continuum. Based upon an understanding of the multi-dimensional connectivity of fluvial systems, the module focuses on themes such as sediment and vegetation dynamics, river and floodplain process-form relationships, environmental flows, ecohydraulics and particular issues relating to constrained urban environments. Based on a solid scientific underpinning, the module introduces the legislative context, methods of field survey and assessment, and integrated approaches to the sustainable management of river systems, their flood plains and estuaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Catchment Science in PracticeGEG7318Full year7No

Catchment Science in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will connect students with the water sector practitioner/ stakeholder community and deepen understanding of science-based catchment management. The module will explore the ways in which advances in scientific understanding of catchment systems and developments in water policy have been translated into management, and the challenges associated with this. Students will engage with a diverse range of practitioners and stakeholder groups including government organisations, environmental consultancies, third sector/ charitable organisations and professional bodies to gain a broader perspective on catchment management and to develop a network of contacts. The module will also provide students with an opportunity to reflect on the knowledge and skills developed during the programme and how these can be communicated effectively to potential employers. The module is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars led by Geography teaching staff, guest lectures and workshops by representatives from the water sector, field visits, student-led reading groups and attendance at external events.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semesters 1 and 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

DissertationGEG7402Full year7No

Dissertation

Credits: 60.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will involve students completing a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic related to community organising. This can be either (1) a humanities-style thesis that scrutinises key ideas in relation to their deployment by broad-based community organisations (including the use of secondary data, and if appropriate, some original empirical material); (2) a social sciences-style thesis that sets out to answer a number of research questions pertinent to the work of broad-based community organisations through the acquisition of original research data; or (3) an action research project that is based on a collective project with members of a community organisation whereby the group focuses on a particular topic and devises their own methods for collecting data with the support and assistance of the student. In this case, students will write up the action research work that was undertaken and reflect on the experience as well as the results. Students will meet an academic supervisor once a month from January to July for support in planning, executing and completing the dissertation.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

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